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HBR: What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

https://hbr.org/2020/01/what-it-takes-to-give-a-great-presentation

1) Great presenters use fewer slides — and fewer words.

2) Great presenters don’t use bullet points.

3) Great presenters enhance their vocal delivery.

4) Great presenters create “wow” moments.

5) Great presenters rehearse.

Stephen

 

Posted on: January 20, 2020, 6:46 am Category: Uncategorized

Machine learning is innately conservative and wants you to either act like everyone else, or never change

Machine learning is innately conservative and wants you to either act like everyone else, or never change

Stephen

Posted on: January 19, 2020, 6:44 am Category: Uncategorized

“Inside the E-Book ‘War’ Waging Between Libraries And Publishers”

Report: “Inside the E-Book ‘War’ Waging Between Libraries And Publishers”

“From WGBH/Boston:

As frustrated as libraries are with the high prices, time-limited access and long waitlists, these new embargos have libraries up in arms.

“It’s a war. It’s a battle for what is right and what is fair,” said [Esmé E.] Green, of the Goodnow Library in Sudbury and president of the Massachusetts Library Association.

She argued that publishers have the wrong target. Libraries have played a critical role in introducing the public to digital books, she argues, and creating buzz about new releases. “We embraced the technology, we showed people how to use it, we made it accessible,” Green said.

However, most of all, she said, the idea of an embargo — of limiting access — is antithetical to the whole idea of libraries. The goal of libraries, she said, is to help make knowledge more accessible to those who might not be able to pay for it.

“The library has been helping people for hundreds of years. That’s what we do. And so, if you take that away, you’re actually hurting your communities,” Green said. “It’s not good for our social fabric.”

Read the Complete Article (approx 2100 words)

Stephen

Posted on: January 18, 2020, 6:43 am Category: Uncategorized

People who read books are nicer than those who don’t, study finds.

People who read books are nicer than those who don’t, study finds.

People who read books are nicer than those who don’t, study finds.

Posted on: January 17, 2020, 2:19 pm Category: Uncategorized

A newly proposed bill, HB 2044, in Missouri would send librarians to jail for checking out books… Seriously!

A newly proposed bill, HB 2044, in Missouri would send librarians to jail for checking out books… Seriously!

Odious of so many levels!

ALA responds to potential legislation in Missouri

Banned book display at the Springfield–Greene County (Mo.) Library DistrictMissouri House Bill 2044, introduced on January 8, proposes the creation of five-member “parental library review boards” to identify “age-inappropriate” public library materials and restrict access to them. According to its sponsor, State Rep. Ben Baker (R-Neosho), the bill grew out of concerns with drag queen story hours at public libraries. It proposes criminal prosecution for library workers who make those materials available to minors and would deny funding to libraries that do not employ parental review boards. The ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom released a statement on the legislation that reads, in part: “We support the right of families and individuals to choose materials from a diverse spectrum of ideas and beliefs.” The Missouri Library Association has also issued a statement.

This is the United States and EveryLibrary has a petition ging:

“A newly proposed bill, HB 2044, in Missouri would send librarians to jail for checking out books… Seriously!

The worst part is that we are seeing similar tactics begin to circulate in other states. We need to stop it here, in Missouri, before it spreads to other states.



Sign the petition today regardless of where you live.
Then, help us reach more Americans like you by clicking here to share it on FACEBOOK and TWITTER


House Bill 2044 sets up a crisis that does not exist in libraries. Materials in libraries are already reviewed by librarians who are specifically trained in collection development. They select age-appropriate materials based on a wide range of guidelines. Library users may also already challenge the placement of materials in a library through a process for reconsideration. In many cases, this process already includes the library board, elected officials, and members of the public. HB 2044 would create an unnecessary, unwieldy, unfunded, duplicative, and overly bureaucratic mockery of a long-standing and working review process.

CLICK TO SHARE ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER

Ultimately, the decision to access materials in the library should be a decision made between a parent and their own children and not a new bureaucratic, unregulated government tribunal.

The high cost of enforcement also means that Missouri will see an increase in taxes to pay for this overarching government censorship. If we start sending librarians to jail over the content of books, it costs approximately $31,000 to house an inmate in prison for one year in Missouri. The cost of this bill is also exacerbated by the fact that each library in the state must hold a publicly funded review panel election for every 5 person review board required. Is this how we want our tax dollars to be spent?”

 

Posted on: January 17, 2020, 1:45 pm Category: Uncategorized

How Toronto’s Leading the Way in Library Innovation: A Conversation with Pam Ryan

How Toronto’s Leading the Way in Library Innovation: A Conversation with Pam Ryan

https://medium.com/sidewalk-toronto/how-torontos-leading-the-way-in-library-innovation-a-conversation-with-pam-ryan-df1bf02b0590

 

 

 

Posted on: January 17, 2020, 10:15 am Category: Uncategorized

The security and privacy issues that come with the Internet of Things

The security and privacy issues that come with the Internet of Things

Snippet:
Security Continues to Concern IoT Developers

“IoT Security Issues

  1. Public Perception: If the IoT is ever going to truly take off, this needs to be the first problem that manufacturers address. The 2015 Icontrol State of the Smart Home study found that 44% of all Americans were “very concerned” about the possibility of their information getting stolen from their smart home, and 27% were “somewhat concerned.” With that level of worry, consumers would hesitate to purchase connected devices.
  2. Vulnerability to Hacking: Researchers have been able to hack into real, on-the-market devices with enough time and energy, which means hackers would likely be able to replicate their efforts. For example, a team of researchers at Microsoft and the University of Michigan found a plethora of holes in the security of Samsung’s SmartThings smart home platform, and the methods were far from complex.
  3. Are Companies Ready?: AT&T’s Cybersecurity Insights Report surveyed more than 5,000 enterprises around the world and found that 85% of enterprises are in the process of or intend to deploy IoT devices. Yet a mere 10% of those surveyed feel confident that they could secure those devices against hackers.
  4. True Security: Jason Porter, AT&T’s VP of security solutions, told Insider Intelligence that securing IoT devices means more than simply securing the actual devices themselves. Companies also need to build security into software applications and network connections that link to those devices.

IoT Privacy Issues

  1. Too Much Data: The sheer amount of data that IoT devices can generate is staggering. A Federal Trade Commission report entitled “Internet of Things: Privacy & Security in a Connected World” found that fewer than 10,000 households can generate 150 million discrete data points every day. This creates more entry points for hackers and leaves sensitive information vulnerable.
  2. Unwanted Public Profile: You’ve undoubtedly agreed to terms of service at some point, but have you ever actually read through an entire document? The aforementioned FTC report found that companies could use collected data that consumers willingly offer to make employment decisions. For example, an insurance company might gather information from you about your driving habits through a connected car when calculating your insurance rate. The same could occur for health or life insurance thanks to fitness trackers.
  3. Eavesdropping: Manufacturers or hackers could actually use a connected device to virtually invade a person’s home. German researchers accomplished this by intercepting unencrypted data from a smart meter device to determine what television show someone was watching at that moment.
  4. Consumer Confidence: Each of these problems could put a dent in consumers’ desire to purchase connected products, which would prevent the IoT from fulfilling its true potential.”
Stephen

Posted on: January 17, 2020, 6:40 am Category: Uncategorized