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Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read … and the movies and TV shows we watch

Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read

… and the movies and TV shows we watch

Atlantic Monthly

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/01/what-was-this-article-about-again/551603/

“Books, shows, movies, and songs aren’t files we upload to our brains—they’re part of the tapestry of life, woven in with everything else. From a distance, it may become harder to see a single thread clearly, but it’s still in there.

“It’d be really cool if memories were just clean—information comes in and now you have a memory for that fact,” Horvath says. “But in truth, all memories are everything.””

Stephen

Posted on: February 22, 2018, 6:48 am Category: Uncategorized

“Disinformation Warfare: Understanding State-Sponsored Trolls on Twitter and Their Influence on the Web” (Preprint)

New Research Article: “Disinformation Warfare: Understanding State-Sponsored Trolls on Twitter and Their Influence on the Web” (Preprint)

http://www.infodocket.com/2018/02/05/new-research-article-disinformation-warfare-understanding-state-sponsored-trolls-on-twitter-and-their-influence-on-the-web-preprint/

“The following research article (preprint) was recently shared by its authors on arXiv.

Title

Disinformation Warfare: Understanding State-Sponsored Trolls on Twitter and Their Influence on the Web

Authors

Savvas Zannettou
Cyprus University of Technology

Tristan Caulfield
University College London

Emiliano De Cristofaro
University College London

Michael Sirivianos
Cyprus University of Technology

Gianluca Stringhini
University College London

Jeremy Blackburn
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Source

via @arXiv

Abstract

Over the past couple of years, anecdotal evidence has emerged linking coordinated campaigns by state-sponsored actors with efforts to manipulate public opinion on the Web, often around major political events, through dedicated accounts, or “trolls.” Although they are often involved in spreading disinformation on social media, there is little understanding of how these trolls operate, what type of content they disseminate, and most importantly their influence on the information ecosystem.

In this paper, we shed light on these questions by analyzing 27K tweets posted by 1K Twitter users identified as having ties with Russia’s Internet Research Agency and thus likely state-sponsored trolls. We compare their behavior to a random set of Twitter users, finding interesting differences in terms of the content they disseminate, the evolution of their account, as well as their general behavior and use of the Twitter platform. Then, using a statistical model known as Hawkes Processes, we quantify the influence that these accounts had on the dissemination of news on social platforms such as Twitter, Reddit, and 4chan.

Overall, our findings indicate that Russian troll accounts managed to stay active for long periods of time and to reach a substantial number of Twitter users with their messages. When looking at their ability of spreading news content and making it viral, however, we find that their effect on social platforms was minor, with the significant exception of news published by the Russian state-sponsored news outlet RT (Russia Today).

Direct to Full Text Article
11 pages; PDF.”

Stephen

Posted on: February 22, 2018, 6:26 am Category: Uncategorized

The death of the CD industry is leaving millions of audiophile holdouts in the lurch

The death of the CD industry is leaving millions of audiophile holdouts in the lurch

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-compact-disc-industry-is-officially-dead-charts-2018-2

chart of the day

Stephen

Posted on: February 21, 2018, 8:50 am Category: Uncategorized

The Cognitive Biases That Convince You the World Is Falling Apart

The Cognitive Biases That Convince You the World Is Falling Apart

Good to know.

Stephen

Posted on: February 21, 2018, 6:42 am Category: Uncategorized

New Research Report and Data File: “Polarization, Partisanship and Junk News Consumption over Social Media in the US”

New Research Report and Data File: “Polarization, Partisanship and Junk News Consumption over Social Media in the US”

“The following article and data file from the Project on Computational Propaganda at the University of Oxford was posted online today.

Title

Polarization, Partisanship and Junk News Consumption over Social Media in the US

Authors

Vidya Narayana
Oxford Univeristy

Vlad Barash
Graphika

John Kelly
Graphika

Bence Kollanyi
Oxford Univeristy

Lisa-Maria Neudert
Oxford Univeristy

Philip N. Howard
Oxford Univeristy

Source

Project on Computational Propaganda
Data Memo 2018.1.

Abstract

What kinds of social media users read junk news? We examine the distribution of the most significant sources of junk news in the three months before President Donald Trump’s first State of the Union Address. Drawing on a list of sources that consistently publish political news and information that is extremist, sensationalist, conspiratorial, masked commentary, fake news and other forms of junk news, we find that the distribution of such content is unevenly spread across the ideological spectrum. We demonstrate that (1) on Twitter, a network of Trump supporters shares the widest range of known junk news sources and circulates more junk news than all the other groups put together; (2) on Facebook, extreme hard right pages—distinct from Republican pages—share the widest range of known junk news sources and circulate more junk news than all the other audiences put together; (3) on average, the audiences for junk news on Twitter share a wider range of known junk news sources tha n audiences on Facebook’s public pages.

Resources

Article/Data Memo
6 pages; PDF

Online supplement
9 pages; PDF

Seed List/Sources
.xlsx”

Stephen

Posted on: February 21, 2018, 6:25 am Category: Uncategorized

IFLA: Social Justice: a Core Library Mission

Social Justice: a Core Library Mission

“On the World Day of Social Justice, it is a good moment to celebrate libraries as social justice institutions. Places where the power that information and knowledge can bring is available for all.

The core functions of libraries are already reflected in the right of access to information, and the right to participate in the cultural life of the community, both of which appear in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. These rights are included as part of an overall framework that seeks to promote free, just and peaceful societies.

For the lucky, access to information and culture may not seem like a challenge. They can afford the books they and their family want to read. They have benefitted from a high-quality education, and work for companies that invest in their skills. They were early-adopters of digital technology, and have the latest gadgets and the free time to learn to use them. They are confident in speaking out, and expect to be heard.

Logo for SDG5: Gender Equality. Women are too often on the wrong side of the information divide.

But the ‘lucky’ are only a part – perhaps a small part – of the whole. For others, access is not a reality. They cannot afford books, Internet connections, or subscriptions, or cannot find materials that are relevant for them. For some types of information – such as scientific journals – only a tiny proportion of individuals can realistically expect to be able to buy all that they might need.

The skills to make this access meaningful are also important. Yet it is often those who struggle with the costs of information that also lack the knowledge or confidence needed to apply it. This holds them back from taking better decisions and improving their lives. Many of these themes are covered in the 2017 Development and Access to Information report, produced by IFLA in partnership with the Technology and Social Change Group at the University of Washington.

Libraries offer a solution. As a long-standing form of the sharing economy, they ensure that one book can have many different readers. They are welcoming spaces, where all can come and learn and train. They are professionally bound in many cases to ensuring that all members of their community benefit from their services (including the migrant workers who are a key focus of this year’s Social Justice Day – see these guidelines from IFLA’s Section for Libraries serving Multicultural Populations). They do not means-test in general, ensuring that those who need them most are not stigmatised.

Even in the richest societies, libraries have a strong role as a core public service, providing access and support to those who need it. Many of those they help will turn into book-buyers in future, thanks to the education and encouragement they have received. Some may not, but it remains a duty of government to fulfil their rights too.

This is why the mission of libraries – to provide meaningful, universal access to information – is a social justice mission. And why on World Social Justice Day 2018, it is a chance to celebrate what they do.”

Stephen

Posted on: February 20, 2018, 2:05 pm Category: Uncategorized

THE WIRED GUIDE TO BITCOIN

THE WIRED GUIDE TO BITCOIN

The cryptocurrency represents amazing technological advances. Bitcoin has a way to go before it’s a a true replacement for, or even adjunct to, the global financial system.

https://www.wired.com/story/guide-bitcoin/

Stephen

Posted on: February 20, 2018, 6:39 am Category: Uncategorized