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IFLA Releases Library Map of the World

 Via Kim Silk:

“In an effort to strengthen advocacy for libraries at the global, regional and national levels, IFLA officially launched the Library Map of the World project at IFLA’s WLIC 2017 in Wrocław. The purpose of the map is to provide basic information about the state of the libraries around the world.

IFLA Library Map of the World

A set of selected library metrics provide national level library data across all types of libraries in all regions of the world. Country-level metrics include:

  • number of libraries
  • libraries with Internet access
  • number of full-time staff
  • number of volunteers
  • number of registered users
  • number of in-person visits
  • number of physical loans
  • number of electronic loans

This is only the beginning of this very exciting project; announced at WLIC 2016 in Columbus, when data collection commenced, IFLA continues to seek feedback to put more countries on the map and to increase the data and evidence that will strengthen our combined advocacy efforts.”

Stephen

Posted on: September 23, 2017, 6:40 am Category: Uncategorized

Ithaka S+R: “Rethinking Liaison Programs for the Humanities”

A New Issue Brief From Ithaka S+R: “Rethinking Liaison Programs for the Humanities”

Rethinking Liaison Programs for the Humanities (issue brief) was published by Ithaka S+R today. The paper is based in part on a talk given by the co-authors at CNI, Spring 2017.

Title

The Rethinking Liaison Programs for the Humanities

Authors

Danielle Cooper
Ithaka S+R

Roger C. Schonfeld
Ithaka S+R

From the Introduction

2017-07-26_12-57-51For generations, most research libraries have had employees with deep subject expertise. Once known as bibliographers, these scholars and librarians originally focused their efforts on selection for collection building. Today, there is real anxiety about the role of subject expertise and academic liaisons in research libraries. We argue that evidence about scholars’ practices and needs should be a key input into reorganizing library subject expertise.

Direct to Full Text ||| PDF Version (16 pages)

Stephen

Posted on: September 23, 2017, 6:02 am Category: Uncategorized

New Data From Nielsen on the Use of Media by Millennials

New Data From Nielsen on the Use of Media by Millennials

http://www.infodocket.com/2017/08/27/new-data-from-nielsen-on-the-use-of-media-by-millennials/

“From Nielsen:

It’s abundantly clear that Millennials approach digital content consumption differently from the rest of the population. More specifically, Millennials are an unfocused audience, not particularly loyal to just one digital music or communication service. But this doesn’t mean Millennials are consuming less content. This demographic is engaged with digital services during all waking hours of the day and while there are plenty of digital services from which to choose, Millennials are not choosing either/or, but many, and the opportunities are endless for how marketers and advertisers will capitalize on the plethora of their usage behaviors.

millennials-on-millennials-chart-3

Source: Nielsen

millennials-on-millennials-chart-2

Source: Nielsen

Direct to Summary Blog Post

Direct to Download Complete Report (Free, Registration Required)

See Also: Chart: Millennials Time Spent with Media (via Nielsen)

Stephen

Posted on: September 22, 2017, 6:38 am Category: Uncategorized

Friday Fun: 16 simple tech pranks to confuse your friends

16 simple tech pranks to confuse your friends

http://mashable.com/2017/08/06/cellphone-computer-tech-pranks/

Stephen

Posted on: September 22, 2017, 6:38 am Category: Uncategorized

The 10 Technologies That Most Drive Law Firm Effectiveness, According to New Survey

The 10 Technologies That Most Drive Law Firm Effectiveness, According to New Survey

The 10 Technologies That Most Drive Law Firm Effectiveness, According to New Survey

Stephen

Posted on: September 21, 2017, 6:42 am Category: Uncategorized

9 ways to get teens reading

9 ways to get teens reading

Practical ideas to help lure your kids back to books

http://www.salon.com/2017/08/27/get-teens-reading_partner/

“Parents know how to inspire a love of books in babies and toddlers: Just put ’em on your lap, and start reading. But as kids get older and go to school, reading can be seen as work rather than fun — and kids, especially teens, may stop reading for pleasure. Here are nine ways to get teens reading, either again or for the first time.

  • Find the “why” in YA. YA (young adult) novels tackle the edgy issues teens struggle with, from peer pressure and romantic longing to grief and trouble at home or school. Whether they’re personally grappling with these issues or seeking vicarious thrills, teens gravitate toward subject matter that’s relatable. Check the YA bestseller lists and our book reviews for ideas.
  • Merge movies with books. Hollywood is turning to teen lit for ideas more than ever. Offer your teen the print version to read before or after a big film adaptation comes out, and talk about the similarities and differences between the two. Check out our list of Books to Read Before They’re Movies in 2016.
  • Get graphic. Gone are the days when graphic novels were dismissed as comic books. Now recognized as literature, they may be the key to getting some teens hooked on books. They’re available in a wide range of genres — from adventure and fantasy to historical fiction, memoir, and biography — so certainly there’s a graphic novel out there to suit your teen’s taste. See our editors’ picks for Graphic Novels and Graphic Novels That Teach History.
  • Lure ’em with adult books. Find nonfiction titles on subjects your teen’s curious about, such as climate change, race, political corruption, or true crime. Check adult nonfiction bestseller lists to see what’s catching fire. Funny adult books also work (by David Sedaris or Tina Fey, for example), as do horror (Stephen King), mysteries (Agatha Christie), thrillers (James Patterson, John Grisham), fantasy (George R.R. Martin), science fiction (Isaac Asimov), and sports (Michael Lewis).
  • Try poetry. Novels in verse are a popular trend. All that white space on the page makes them easy to read, and the spare, lyrical approach can really pack a punch. Try Sarah Crossan’s “One,” Stasia Ward Kehoe’s “The Sound of Letting Go“, or Ellen Hopkins’ “Rumble“. Memoirs in verse are taking hold, too; check out Marilyn Nelson’s “How I Discovered Poetry.
  • Let them listen. Spark teens’ interest by getting an audio book to listen to on the way to school or on long drives. Let them download audiobooks to their smartphones. (They won’t risk looking uncool, because they’ll be under headphones or have their earbuds in.)
  • Model reading. Read at home where your teens can see you. Talk about what you’re reading, and express your enjoyment. Always take a book or magazine along when you go to the beach or face waiting in a long line. Send your teen the message that reading is a pleasure, not a chore.
  • Keep reading material around. Kids who grow up with lots of books around tend to read more. Stock the bathroom, car, dining table — wherever there’s a captive audience — with comic books, graphic novels, and magazines geared to your teens’ interests; first books in hit YA series; or classic sci-fi and mysteries. There’s nothing wrong with “micro-reading.”
  • Give the gift of reading. Hand your teen a gift card to your local bookstore. They’ll discover the treasure-hunt fun of looking for a good book.”

Stephen

Posted on: September 21, 2017, 6:29 am Category: Uncategorized

This chart shows how drastically young Americans are cutting traditional TV from their lives

This chart shows how drastically young Americans are cutting traditional TV from their lives

http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-shows-young-americans-are-turning-their-backs-on-traditional-tv-2017-7

Chart Of The Day 7/31

Stephen

Posted on: September 20, 2017, 6:48 am Category: Uncategorized