Skip to content


How YouTube increased classroom pass rates by 31%

How YouTube increased classroom pass rates by 31%

http://i.imgur.com/dcDI7Jd.jpg

 

Stephen

Posted on: October 22, 2014, 7:05 am Category: Uncategorized

Competency-Based Education Framework & Readiness Assessment

Competency-Based Education Framework & Readiness Assessment

PDF: http://home.pearsonhighered.com/content/dam/ped/penak12/US/pearsonhighered/documents/CBE-Framework-Update.pdf

Competency-Based Education Framework & Readiness Assessment

 

Stephen

Posted on: October 22, 2014, 7:02 am Category: Uncategorized

5 reasons you should have a library card

5 reasons you should have a library card

Via: http://searchresearch1.blogspot.ca/2014/10/5-reasons-you-should-have-library-card.html

“One of the more powerful research tools you can have is a library card.

A library card is instant access to a world of resources. Both offline AND online.  

That might surprise you, but here are 5 reasons why you want a library card to be a great researcher.

  1. Access to online paywall content. My local library gives paywall access to Ancestry.com, Morningstar, online journals, and more.  It also provides Hoopla video (https://www.hoopladigital.com/ for downloads, and many free music downloads (lots of popular music, some of which really surprised me—this is free?  Yes!).  It also provides many different database services:  a small listing includes, Academic Onefile (journals, magazines, books, audio – great subject browser), InfoTrac (news and periodical.Updated daily.)  Can filter by type, sort by date.  General One File  and MasterFile Complete (EBSCO).  Many libraries have all this, and more.
  1. eBooks. Yes, just like physical books, many libraries support borrowing ebooks and e-magazines, typically with time restrictions on how long you can keep them, and sometimes twitchy software, but free’s free—I’ve read many books that I knew I only wanted for a short time.
  1. Local archives. Many libraries have archival content that’s never going to make it online (at least in our lifetimes). If you’re doing research on a particular location, visiting physically is often the best thing to do.  But if you can’t get there, checking out the online library can often lead to content that you won’t be able to find via search engines.  (Go figure.  For some reason, many local libraries have put great content online, but then set it up so the search engines can’t index it, making it effectively offline.  On the other hand, if you connect via the library, you can often browse that content.)
  1. Classes. I teach at libraries. So do lots of other people with great skills. Local libraries are especially good on local history, genealogy classes, general internet skill tutorials, and basic computer skills (such as the common applications).  Sometimes libraries put these classes (at least the lecture parts) up on YouTube.
  1. Reference Librarians.  They’re excellent resources of information and a source of research skills. When you go to your public library, be sure to chat with the reference librarians.  They are, in essence, professional SearchReseachers.  They know all kinds of things that are key to finding information (both online and offline) in places and in ways you might not have thought about.  (Better yet:  Many of them are available via IMs and email.  Remember the superb “Ask-A-Librarian” service is always available.  They might take a day to get back to you, but they’re very, very good.)

How to get a library card:  In North America it’s easy–just go there and fill out a simple application form.  Generally, they want you to be somewhat local, but that’s not always the case.  (I have a Los Angeles County library card because I used to live in LA County–that was good enough.)   I make it a habit to check out the libraries at different places I visit because you never know what’s possible or what they have.  Libraries are very different from each other.  When you visit, ask to see their list of online resources, and if you can get a card that will allow remote access. You’ll be surprised how often they’ll say yes.

College and University library cards.  Note that college or university library cards often come with even deeper research databases than public libraries.  Alumni can often get a library card that will allow access to their paywall access databases.  I have a couple of these (from different places where I’ve attended or taught.)  If you can get one, get it. Check out the alumni web pages at your university or college.  Again, the libraries vary tremendously.  See what your college offers.

Virtual library card:   You can get a “virtual library card” from a number of places.  The Internet Archive has one that seems to be accepted at a surprising number of places.  But a quick search for [ "virtual library card" ] will show you a number of real libraries that hand out virtual cards to anyone who applies.  With these virtual cards, you will have access to a large number of resources, including most of those listed above.

(And if you have great research experiences with your local library, write in and let us know.  I’m especially interested in the online library card experiences of people not in the US!)

Search on, with your library card! ”

 

Stephen

Posted on: October 22, 2014, 6:31 am Category: Uncategorized

NAHSL Conference – Rockport Maine

Here are my slides from this morning’s keynote at the NAHSL Conference in Rockport Maine.

Stephen

Posted on: October 21, 2014, 9:52 am Category: Uncategorized

Social Media Etiquette Guide

Social Media Etiquette Guide

http://www.tollfreeforwarding.com/blog/social-media-etiquette-guide/

 

1

Stephen

Posted on: October 21, 2014, 6:55 am Category: Uncategorized

There Are Really Just Four Kinds of Cities In the World

Large Urban libraries take note:

There Are Really Just Four Kinds of Cities In the World

http://gizmodo.com/there-are-really-just-four-kinds-of-cities-in-the-world-1643813660

Most of us want to believe that our cities are unique, special snowflakes, unlike anywhere else in the world. But a new study analyzing 131 different city grids has found that every city falls into one of four categories. Staten Island, for example, has a lot in common with the Syrian city of As-Suwayda.

The study is titled A typology of street patterns, and in it, authors Rémi Louf and Marc Barthelemy explain how a complex mathematical analysis of each city’s block shape, size, and layout was used to define four discrete city types.”

“Your city might be special to you—but nearly all of our cities share some basic attributes. Though the paper itself is behind the paywall of Journal of the Royal Society Interface, you can get a more information from Science Mag and Discovery. [ScienceMag; QuantUrb; Discovery;Journal of the Royal Society Interface]”

Stephen

Posted on: October 21, 2014, 6:53 am Category: Uncategorized

How to Get Over Your Fear of Conflict

How to Get Over Your Fear of Conflict

http://99u.com/workbook/33301/how-to-get-over-your-fear-of-conflict

/So how to avoid avoiding conflict? Su provides some strategies:

Focus on the business needs: When you avoid conflict, you’re actually putting the focus squarely on yourself. Take the focus off you and your fear and concentrate on what the business needs. . .

Keep a calm demeanor: People who shy away from conflict often assume that it has to look aggressive, overbearing, or disrespectful. It doesn’t. . .’

Start with baby steps: Like any muscle you build, it takes practice and repetition before you can ratchet up your abilities. Start with easier situations first and address the conflict retrospectively (it can be hard to do it in the moment at first).

Consider the big picture (that is bigger than you) when deciding whether or not to deal with conflict. Resolution may just be important for the health of your business.”

Stephen

Posted on: October 21, 2014, 6:30 am Category: Uncategorized