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New College Board Trends in Higher Education Reports: College Prices Increase at a Slower Pace While Student Borrowing Declines for the Third Consecutive Year

Via Gary Price at FullTextReports

http://fulltextreports.com/2014/11/14/new-college-board-trends-in-higher-education-reports-college-prices-increase-at-a-slower-pace-while-student-borrowing-declines-for-the-third-consecutive-year/

New College Board Trends in Higher Education Reports: College Prices Increase at a Slower Pace While Student Borrowing Declines for the Third Consecutive Year
Source: College Board

While published tuition and fees at colleges and universities continue to rise more rapidly than the rate of inflation, the rate of increase has slowed. Between 2013-14 and 2014-15, the percentage increases in published tuition and fees (in all sectors) were smaller than the average annual increases over the previous five, 10, and 30 years, according to the College Board’s 2014 Trends in Higher Education reports — Trends in Student Aid and Trends in College Pricing — released today. Total education borrowing fell by 8% between 2012-13 and 2013-14, and by 13% over three years. Borrowing per student declined by 6% in one year and by 9% between 2010-11 and 2013-14.

College pricing and financial aid look very different in 2013 and 2014 than they did in 2010. As the economy has begun to recover from the recent recession, published price increases have slowed, making it clear that prices are not on an accelerating path. However, price increases continue to accumulate, totaling 17% between 2007-08 and 2014-15 at private nonprofit four-year colleges, and almost 30% at public two-year and four-year institutions, after adjusting for inflation.

Posted on: November 28, 2014, 6:42 am Category: Uncategorized

Leaders & Laggards: A State-by-State Report Card on Public Postsecondary Education

Leaders & Laggards: A State-by-State Report Card on Public Postsecondary Education
Source: U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Via Gary Price at FullTextReports

 http://fulltextreports.com/2014/11/10/leaders-laggards-a-state-by-state-report-card-on-public-postsecondary-education/

“This report identifies the best and worst performing states—the leaders and laggards— in public postsecondary education. It focuses on the performance of the institutions over which state governments have the most influence: public colleges and universities. In an effort to systematically measure the most important factors being watched by policymakers, business leaders, and concerned citizens, we graded state performance and policy in the following six areas:

Student Access & Success
Do state institutions retain and graduate a high percentage of their students within a reasonable amount of time?
Do they ensure access for low-income students?

Efficiency & Cost-Effectiveness
How much money do public institutions spend on education and related expenses per degree produced?
How much does it cost, in state and local spending, to produce degrees?

Meeting Labor Market Demand
How much better do college graduates fare than their less-educated peers in terms of employment and wages?

Transparency & Accountability
Do states measure learning and labor market outcomes? Do they routinely make information on the performance of the higher education system available to the public?

Policy Environment
Do states have policies in place that provide incentives to promote degree completion and allow students to transfer course credits freely within the system?

Innovation
Have states made efforts to embrace innovative ways of delivering college instruction?
Do states encourage innovative providers to serve nontraditional students who may be underserved by the existing system?”

 

Stephen

Posted on: November 28, 2014, 6:05 am Category: Uncategorized

Data science: ‘Machines do analytics. Humans do analysis’

Data science: ‘Machines do analytics. Humans do analysis’

Summary: Two leaders of Booz Allen’s data science team talk talent, building a data science team and the machine-human link in analytics.

http://www.zdnet.com/data-science-machines-do-analytics-humans-do-analysis-7000035828/

Pullquote: “The machine/human link. Sullivan isn’t big on analytics technology that serves as a magic bullet to data science. No machine can be a miracle cure. Humans have to find the patterns, ask the right questions and make the connections in the data. “Machines do analytics,” explained Sullivan. “Humans do analysis.” Computers are good at detail and examining the past, but real data science requires imagination and cognitive ability.”

datasciencevenn

Stephen

Posted on: November 27, 2014, 6:35 am Category: Uncategorized

Now Available: BISAC Subject Headings List, 2014 Edition

Now Available: BISAC Subject Headings List, 2014 Edition

“Some libraries utilize BISAC and librarians are also members of the BISG Subject Codes Committee.

From the Book Industry Study Group:

BISG’s BISAC Subject Headings List has been updated and replaces the edition published in November 2013. It is available here.

The BISAC Subject Headings List, 2014 Edition package includes Excel, Word, and PDF formats of the full subject headings list, along with a license allowing the codes to be incorporated into internal systems for unlimited use.

It remains free to BISG members. Non-members can purchase an annual license for unlimited use, or look up individual titles without charge here.

2014 marks the 20th edition of the BISAC Subject Headings List. This update includes 71 additions; among them, 11 new Fiction headings including a FICTION/Erotica tree and 14 new headings in Literary Criticism. The most extensive changes overall were made in the Travel category.

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The 2014 BISAC Subject Headings List includes updated BISAC to Thema and BIC to BISAC Mappings, which will be released this winter. Please watch for those announcements.

The BISAC Subject Headings are maintained by BISG’s Subject Codes Committee, chaired for the 10th year by Connie Harbison of Baker & Taylor. Committee members represent major publishers, wholesalers and other data aggregators, libraries and library service providers, and retailers. The Committee makes changes based on a careful evaluation of requests from both publishers and individual BISAC code users, often independent authors.”

Posted on: November 27, 2014, 6:02 am Category: Uncategorized

Seven Reasons Students Use Smartphones in Class

Seven Reasons Students Use Smartphones in Class

http://blog.cengage.com/seven-reasons-students-use-smartphones-in-class/

What students are doing with their smartphones in class

 

“77% of students bring a smartphone to class, and 63% of the students said that they weren’t a distraction. On the other hand, 72% of instructors said that they do distract students from the learning process.”

Stephen

 

Posted on: November 26, 2014, 6:31 am Category: Uncategorized

Researcher Data Sharing Insights

Researcher Data Sharing Insights

https://scholarlykitchen.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/researcher-data-insights-infographic-final.pdf

Researcher Data Insights -- Infographic FINAL

http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2014/11/11/to-share-or-not-to-share-that-is-the-research-data-question/

Stephen

Posted on: November 26, 2014, 6:12 am Category: Uncategorized

Third Draft of Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education Available for Comment

Third Draft of Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education Available for Comment
“ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force seeks feedback on the third draft of the association’s proposed Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Read the document and welcome messagehighlighting major changes since the June second draft then provide feedback via an online form by 5pm Central on Friday, December 12, 2014.

Members of the task force are grateful for all the robust input in reaction to the proposed Framework gathered through online feedback forms, member forums and hearings (face-to-face and online), member emails, conversations in social media, as well as comments from the ACRL Board of Directors. The task force takes all this feedback seriously, and has used these comments to guide and improve the third draft. As they carefully considered all the input gathered over the summer and fall, task force members recognize some questions/concerns are recurring and have addressed those in the Frequently Asked Questionsection of their website.”

Stephen

Posted on: November 25, 2014, 3:26 pm Category: Uncategorized