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The Value of Information Professionals

The Value of Information Professionals

http://taxodiary.com/2014/09/the-value-of-information-professionals/

Via TaxoDiary

“CMS Wire brought this news to our attention in their article, “Library Science, Not Library Silence.”

This article lifts up the “Top 5 DAM Benefits of an Information Professional.”

  • Taxonomy construction — Where does one start? What has worked for others? Which categorization methods lead to corners? Which are most scalable?
  • Metadata perspective — What are some best practices in use of structured metadata, including menus, controlled vocabularies, etc. When are free-form text fields better?
  • Policy authoring — What does DAM policy look like? What happens without it? How does one monitor and measure it?
  • User education — Until DAMs get to the point where they are more advanced and intuitive, some training will be involved. Good training curriculum flows as an extension of user experience design: What the UI can’t make obvious, the training covers. But who’s going to do that training or write those how-to guides?
  • Vendor advisories — Do vendors really know how controlled vocabularies should be used? Vendors listen to users, but users aren’t always experts. Don’t leave industry analysis to industry analysts. Write up some teaser reviews and send them to product managers. Show us vendors what we’re missing.”

Read the whole article.  I love the phrase ‘preemptive intelligence analyst’.

Stephen

Posted on: September 23, 2014, 6:37 am Category: Uncategorized

Community-Led Libraries Toolkit

Useful toolkit from VPL and the Working Together Project

Community-Led Libraries Toolkit

Vancouver Public Library (VPL) initiated the Working Together Project¹ in 2004 to develop methods for libraries to
work with low-income communities through a community development approach. Funded as a demonstration project
by the Offi ce of Learning Technologies of Human Resources and Social Development Canada, funding was available
over three years which was extended to four. The long-term funding was invaluable, allowing the participating libraries
both to undertake the lengthy process of understanding and implementing community development approaches and
to incorporate some of their lessons into their library systems. Unfortunately, program and funding constraints centred
the Project on urban communities, despite recognition that rural libraries have similar issues

http://www.librariesincommunities.ca/resources/Community-Led_Libraries_Toolkit.pdf

145 page PDF

If you want to influence the new edition, check out this survey here by Friday October 3rd:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/6P3M9RX

Stephen

Posted on: September 23, 2014, 6:24 am Category: Uncategorized

Robin Williams Library Riffs

Robin Williams Library Riffs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ccPSr-wdO4

Stephen

Posted on: September 23, 2014, 6:22 am Category: Uncategorized

The State Of The Global Smartphone Industry

The State Of The Global Smartphone Industry

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-top-smartphone-industry-stats-2014-9

“Here are the top stats:

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-top-smartphone-industry-stats-2014-9#ixzz3E3WsoWgH

GlobalSmartphoneShipmentsPlatform

Stephen

Posted on: September 22, 2014, 12:42 pm Category: Uncategorized

Top 100 Tools for Learning 2014 is ready

Top 100 Tools for Learning 2014 is ready

http://janeknight.typepad.com/pick/2014/09/top-100-tools-for-learning-2014-is-ready.html

You can view this year’s list here.

Don’t forget to read Jane’s Analysis

“The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2014  – the results of the 8th Annual Learning Tools Survey –  has been compiled by Jane Hart from the votes of 1,038 learning professionals from 61 countries worldwide and published on 22 September 2014

The 2014 List is shown in the left hand column, follow the links to find our more about each of the tools. The slideset appears below. You can view some of the individual contributions here.

A learning tool is defined as any software or online tool or service that you use either for your own personal or professional learning, for teaching or training, or for creating e-learning

The annual lists have also become a useful longitudinal study into how the way we learn is changing. Take a look at this year’s analysis or if you are surprised at the results, read The Web is 25 years old – so how has it changed the way we learn?

Stephen

Posted on: September 22, 2014, 12:00 pm Category: Uncategorized

New Study Reveals U.S. Students Believe Tablets Are Game Changers in Learning and Student Engagement

New Study Reveals U.S. Students Believe Tablets Are Game Changers in Learning and Student Engagement

http://www.pearsoned.com/new-study-reveals-u-s-students-believe-tablets-are-game-changers-in-learning-and-student-engagement/

“Pearson Survey Shows Mobile Device Use and Ownership Continues to Grow Among Elementary, Middle and High School Students

http://www.sagepub.com/press/2014/june/9.sp

NEW YORK – Sept. 8, 2014– Elementary, middle and high school students overwhelmingly believe that tablets will change the way they learn in the future (90 percent) and make learning more fun (89 percent), according to a new study conducted by Harris Poll and released today by Pearson.

The survey, conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of Pearson, asked 2,252 students how they currently use mobile technology for learning, and how they would like to use it in the future. Survey respondents included 501 elementary school (4th-5th grade) students, 750 middle school (6th-8th grade) students, and 1001 high school (9th – 12th grade) students.

The survey found that while mobile device use and ownership is growing among students of all ages, universal access to high speed Internet and 1:1 computing is still a challenge for schools around the country. Only 62 percent of students have wireless access to the Internet at school, versus 93 percent of students who have wireless access at home. Only one in six students (16 percent) attends a school that provides every student with a laptop or tablet.

“This year’s study findings show a high level of optimism, engagement and confidence with mobile devices among U.S. students,” said Douglas Kubach, president, Pearson’s School group. “While we are seeing consistent growth of mobile device use among students for school work, a gap still exists between home and school access, preventing many schools from taking full advantage of the digital learning technologies available today that can be instrumental in improving educational experiences for students.”

Key findings of the survey are listed below. The full report is available at http://tinyurl.com/k73tjxs.

Impact of Tablets in the Classroom

According to the survey, most students are optimistic regarding the positive impact that tablets will have on the classroom, particularly when it comes to improving student engagement. Among notable findings:

  • 81 percent of students agree that using tablets in the classroom lets them learn in a way that’s best for them.
  • 79 percent of students agree that tablets help students do better in class.

The survey found that African American and Hispanic students are more likely than White students to feel that using tablets in the classroom enables them to learn in a way that is best for them (88 percent vs. 86 percent vs. 79 percent, respectively) and that tablets help students learn better in class (83 percent vs. 84 percent vs. 77 percent, respectively).

Mobile Device Usage Overall

Mobile device usage is high and growing among elementary, middle and high school students. Older students tend to use smartphones, while younger students use tablets more often. Among notable findings:

  • 66 percent of elementary students and 58 percent of middle school students regularly use a tablet. In 2013, 52 percent of elementary school students and 43 percent of middle school students reported that they regularly used a small or full-size tablet.
  • While 75 percent of high school students regularly use a smartphone, only 42 percent of high school students regularly use a tablet at home or school.

Mobile Device Ownership

Smartphone and laptop ownership increases with grade level, while tablets are most common among elementary students:

  • More than half of students (54 percent) in grades 4-12 already own a smartphone.
  • 51 percent of elementary and 52 percent of middle schools students own a tablet, but only 36 percent of high school students do.

Mobile Device Usage for School Work

Regarding the use of mobile devices for school work, laptops remain the most commonly used across all students surveyed, with high school students using laptops the most. Tablet usage is most common among elementary school students. Other notable findings include:

  • Eight in ten students report using a laptop to do school work during the school year.
  • About half of the students surveyed have used tablets or smartphones to do their school work during the school year (49 percent and 47 percent, respectively).
  • Three in ten students use smartphones or tablets on a weekly basis to do their school work (30 percent and 29 percent, respectively).
  • High school students are far more likely than either elementary or middle school students to use their smartphones every week in order to do school work (43 percent vs. 17 percent vs. 20 percent, respectively).

1:1 in the Classroom

The survey found that while all students want more mobile device use in the classroom, only one in six students (16 percent) attends a school that provides every student with a laptop or tablet. Notable findings include:

  • 71 percent of elementary school students, 67 percent of middle school students and 56 percent of high school students would like to use mobile devices in the classroom more often than they do now.
  • A majority of students across all grade levels (51 percent) feels that it is important for their schools to provide them with a laptop on a 1:1 basis.
  • For students, the most common access to laptops and tablets at school is through either a computer lab (35 percent) or a set of shared, in-class computers (27 percent).
  • Shared, in-class computers are much more common for elementary school students (35 percent) than they are for either middle school (27 percent) or high school students (22 percent).
  • 43 percent of students feel that it is important for their schools to provide them with a tablet 1:1 –- with half of elementary (53 percent) and middle school students (48 percent) feeling this way compared to a third (34 percent) of high school students.

The survey was conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of Pearson between February 13 and March 12, 2014 among 2,252 students nationwide. Pearson will also make the complete tabulations and full methodology, including weighting variables, available upon request.

 

About Pearson

Pearson is the world’s leading learning company, with 40,000 employees in more than 80 countries working to help people of all ages to make measurable progress in their lives through learning. For more information about Pearson, visit www.pearson.com.

About Nielsen & The Harris Poll

On February 3, 2014, Nielsen acquired Harris Interactive and The Harris Poll. Nielsen Holdings N.V. (NYSE: NLSN) is a global information and measurement company with leading market positions in marketing and consumer information, television and other media measurement, online intelligence and mobile measurement. Nielsen has a presence in approximately 100 countries, with headquarters in New York, USA and Diemen, the Netherlands. For more information, visit www.nielsen.com.

Contact:

Brandon Pinette, brandon.pinette@pearson.com, or (800) 745-8489″

 

Stephen

Posted on: September 22, 2014, 6:42 am Category: Uncategorized

The Hidden Benefits of a College Education

The Hidden Benefits of a College Education

http://dailyinfographic.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/1394812427-hiddenbenefitsinfographic.png

Stephen

Posted on: September 22, 2014, 6:19 am Category: Uncategorized