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Crowdfunding and Libraries

Here’s another interesting project about crowdfunding and libraries.

Rod Library Quest for the Microsoft Surface Hub

Rod Library wants to empower and inspire the University of Northern Iowa community to discover, imagine, create and innovate. For several years the library has continued to make positive strides toward enhancing the user experience. Help the library continue on this quest by purchasing a Microsoft Surface Hub. The Surface Hub is a unique tool that has the ability to collaborate, create and share all in one. This tool will give students and faculty a hands-on, real world experience in the classroom and will help create skills for their future.Please help Northern Iowa Jones and the Rod Library provide cutting-edge technology that enables campus development and growth with your generous donations.

Please share our video! Every donation helps Rod Library achieve its goal of bringing this innovative piece of technology to UNI. Donate online above or via mail or phone.

By mail: Make check payable to UNI Foundation with PAWprint: Rod Library on the memo line

Send check to: UNI Foundation Financial Services, 121 Commons, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0239

By phone: Call 319.273.7118

See the video at



Posted on: November 26, 2015, 9:33 am Category: Uncategorized

Infographic: Should I Buy More Books?

Infographic: Should I Buy More Books?



Posted on: November 26, 2015, 6:31 am Category: Uncategorized

Marketing Manifesto for Libraries

Marketing Manifesto for Libraries

“Check out this excellent keynote talk from the Library and Information Association of New Zealand’s annual conference last week.

Ned Potter has posted the video and slides from his “A Library Marketing Manifesto” presentation on his blog:


Posted on: November 26, 2015, 6:13 am Category: Uncategorized

Grammar is good for you – relevance and teaching

Grammar is good for you – relevance and teaching

  1. Grammatical errors are distracting.
  2. Grammatical errors interfere with clarity.
  3. Although exceptions abound, there is a correlation between seniority and literacy.
  4. Just as “Loose lips sink ships,” according to the World War II poster, gruesome grammar hurts happiness.
  5. People who don’t like you will point out your errors to attack you and undermine your position.
  6. “Bad writing makes bright people look dumb,” as William Zinsser once observed so succinctly.
  7. Too many little errors will make you seem careless, sloppy and slovenly.
  8. A single big error, such as writing, “My principle concern is …” when it should be “My principal concern is …” will make readers (a least some readers) think you don’t know what you’re talking about.
  9. Errors annoy people, as I annoyed Paula in my last column when I wrongly questioned the use of “secrete” in this sentence: “The offenders range from international banks to small-town mortgage lenders, which together helped secrete more than 10,000 U.S.-related accounts holding more than $10 billion.” (Paula wrote: “I grabbed my trusty Oxford dictionary and there it was as a secondary definition of secrete: ‘conceal, put into hiding.’ I’m used to people who think they’re smarter than everyone else and often show their ignorance by not verifying their facts before blasting others. But for you to join in the bashing on this common of a word was troubling.”)
  10. Good grammar will make people want to go out with you, according to a recent Wall Street Journal article, as it made Katy von Kühn want to go out with her future husband, Sam, when she saw his posting on a dating site: “The whole reason I responded to Sam was the way he formulated his e-mail.”

Top 10 reasons you should learn to use proper grammar, Stephen Wilbers, Star Tribune, November 15, 2015


Posted on: November 25, 2015, 9:28 am Category: Uncategorized

Infographics: Growth of Sharing in the Collaborative Economy

Infographics: Growth of Sharing in the Collaborative Economy

“Participation in the Collaborative Economy has grown by 25 percent in the past year alone. That’s one of the key findings we shared in The New Rules of the Collaborative Economy, a Vision Critical report I co-authored with tech strategist Alexandra Samuel.

As the infographics below shows, more than 110 million North Americans now do some form of sharing in the Collaborative Economy. More than half of North Americans now get the products and services they need from each other, peer to peer, instead of buying from established corporations.


The rapid rise of the Collaborative Economy raises an important question for businesses: what’s driving the growth of this movement? More importantly, is it a permanent shift in customer behavior? Data in our report, which draws on input from more than 50,000 North Americans, provides some crucial insight on these issues.

We found that a big driver of growth in the Collaborative Economy is the adoption of newer forms of sharing services. In 2014, 16 percent of American sharers engaged in only one form of sharing: by buying and/or sharing pre-owned goods. This year, that number is down to 10 percent because people are trying a broader range of sharing services.

Looking at the various categories of sharing services, we’ve seen an across-the-board increase in sharing. Sharing of goods is still the most common form of participation in the Collaborative Economy, but there’s also significant growth in crowdfunding, space-sharing and custom products. Online learning, a sharing category we included for the first time this year, is already seeing a 15 percent participation rate.


The growth of the Collaborative Economy isn’t about to stop anytime soon. Based on people’s intent, we’re predicting that eight in 10 Americans will be part of the Collaborative Economy by 2017—a 20 percent increase from 2015. Growth of “neo-sharing”—participation in the latest generation of sharing services—will fuel the overall growth of the Collaborative Economy. For every person who has participated in a form of sharing in the past 12 months, there’s a new person who intends to try that type of neo-sharing in the year to come.



Clearly, the Collaborative Economy is here to stay. Combating startups, complementing sharing services and gaining a deeper understanding of the empowered crowd is an urgent call for established corporations today.

So what does this mean for established corporations? Three things:

  1. This is not a fad or trend—it’s a movement that’s here to stay. Adoption is accelerating due to social trends, economic conditions, and availability of powerful technology.
  2. Not all behaviors are the same. As indicated above, the sharing of goods is dominant, but every industry must first understand how their market segment is changing.
  3. Established companies must lead this movement by changing their business models to suit the needs of changing customer preferences. We’ll share more, in our upcoming webinar.

To learn more about the growth of sharing, join me inThe New Rules of the Collaborative Economy, a live webinar with Vision Critical founder Andrew Reid on December 1.”


Posted on: November 25, 2015, 6:02 am Category: Uncategorized

How to Speak to Executives

How to Speak to Executives

““Sales Pitch: How to Sell Your IT Strategy to the Board” at SmartDataCollective. Writer Simon Mitchell points out that, when trying to convince the higher-ups to loosen the purse strings, IT pros are unlikely to succeed if their audience doesn’t understand what they’re talking about. He advises:

“Step out of your technological mindset. Long presentations on subjects outside your audience’s core competence are a waste of everyone’s time. Don’t bore the board with too much detail about how the technology actually works. Focus on the business case for your strategy.”

The write-up goes on to recommend a three-point framework for such presentations: focus on the problem (or opportunity), deliver the strategy, and present costs and benefits. See the post for more on each of these points. It is also smart have the technical details on hand, in case anyone asks. We’re left with four take-aways:

“*Before you present your next big IT initiative to the board, put yourself in their shoes. What do they need to hear?

*Review how you can make tech talk accessible and appealing to non-technical colleagues.

*Keep your presentations short and sweet.

*Focus on the business case for your IT strategy.””


Posted on: November 24, 2015, 11:11 am Category: Uncategorized



  1. “Time saver – Students are busy. Homework, sports, extracurriculars, etc. It’s a lot. Audiobooks enable them to listen to the books they need to read while doing chores, working out, on the bus or before they fall asleep. They can also increase the speed of the title to get through them faster as well.
  2. High Low readers – Some readers struggle to read at their age level or get discouraged from reading at all. Audiobooks are a great solution to allow them to follow the story and get comfortable again with literature.
  3. ESL students – There are many schools across the country who have English as a Second Language Students. Audiobooks are wonderful for teaching these students English grammar and overall language and sentence structure.
  4. Classroom story time – A great way to break up lectures is by having story time with a class. Traditionally, teachers and librarians read while students listen or they have the students read short sections. Try using an audiobook instead and pausing in between chapters to discuss what the students think is happening to work on comprehension.
  5. Critical Listening – Speaking of comprehension…Critical listening is essential in all walks of life and audiobooks force students to hear important information and process it properly.
  6. Introduce new vocabulary – We’ve all been there. You’re reading a book and a word comes along that you simply don’t know so you skip passed it. Audiobooks not only help you learn pronunciation of these words, but by using them properly in a sentence students can better understand what these words mean. You’ll also find that students can tackle titles at higher reading levels thanks to audiobooks.
  7. Convenience – One of the reasons many schools don’t offer traditional audiobooks is because they often come with multiple CDs that can be damaged or lost. Digital audiobooks make this a thing of the past. Titles are enjoyed and then automatically returned.”


Posted on: November 24, 2015, 11:07 am Category: Uncategorized