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The Seven Deadly Sins of AI Predictions

The Seven Deadly Sins of AI Predictions

Mistaken extrapolations, limited imagination, and other common mistakes that distract us from thinking more productively about the future by Rodney Brooks

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/609048/the-seven-deadly-sins-of-ai-predictions/

Stephen

Posted on: October 23, 2017, 6:36 am Category: Uncategorized

Video: A futurist and innovations expert explains what is and isn’t real about AI in movies

A futurist and innovations expert explains what is and isn’t real about AI in movies

Jay Iorio, futurist and Innovations Director for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standards Association, joins us to talk about artificial intelligence on screen. Could we really fall in love with Her? Are Westworld’s ‘reveries’ within reach? How does a Terminator know what’s funny?

http://mashable.com/2017/10/16/reel-or-real-artificial-intelligence/?utm_campaign=Mash-Prod-RSS-Feedburner-All-Partial&utm_cid=Mash-Prod-RSS-Feedburner-All-Partial&utm_source=feedly&utm_medium=webfeeds

Stephen

Posted on: October 23, 2017, 6:33 am Category: Uncategorized

Makerspaces and libraries: READY, FIRE, AIM

Makerspaces and libraries: READY, FIRE, AIM

Via Doug Johnson at Blue Skunk

Makerspaces: On Scanning the Road & Gently Easing the Brakes” (October 3, 2017). She asks:

“Making is important. Informal learning is important. Tinkering is important. Connected learning is important. STEAM is important. Invention is important. Access is important. Project-based learning, problem-based learning and constructionism are important. Student choice and creativity are important.

But should a formal makerspace need to be a part of every school library?  “

 

“Here are some questions I might ask when implementing a makerspace in a school:

  1. Has my school articulated the “why” for its makerspace? Do teachers, administrators, and parents understand the purpose behind creating this very different learning enviroment? Is it in alignment with the school’s mission?
  2. Is there a suitable location for the makerspace? Is the space being considered currently being used for a valuable purpose? Can the makerspace be portable?
  3. How will the efficacy of the makerspace be evaluated?
  4. How will the makerspace support curricular outcomes?
  5. Who has responsibility for managing the makerspace, selecting activities, scheduling the space, maintaining the equipment, supervising the activities?
  6. How can it be assured all students have access to the learning experiences afforded by the makerspace? Will only identified students or students with teacher who are enthusiastic about the philosophy behind making get to use the space?
  7. Who will determine whether the true spirit of making – creativity, problem-solving, self-direction, etc – is being nurtured? Who will monitor to make sure the 3D printer is not being used as an expensive photocopier or the graphics program just a digital coloring book or the programming devices not just a exercise in following instructions?

Great results are nearly always the result of good planning and hard work.”

Stephen

Posted on: October 22, 2017, 6:02 am Category: Uncategorized

Boost Your Learning Capacity: 32 Amazing Tips

Boost Your Learning Capacity: 32 Amazing Tips

https://custom-writing.org/dissertation-writing-services#ways-to-learn-faster

Have you ever felt that there aren’t enough hours in the day? Or that you’re always struggling to get everything done in time?

Students—and anyone trying to learn something new—will probably understand what I’m talking about.

Even if you’re fully invested in the process and have strong motivation, there’s just one thing keeping you from succeeding more: the lack of time.

While it’s impossible to add extra hours to a day, there is still a way out.

Want to know what it is?

Learning faster.

We’ve put together an infographic that will show you how to make the most of the time you have at your disposal.

With 32 different ways of fast learning to choose from, at least some of them will surely be perfectly fitting for you.

It won’t hurt to look through our infographic. And the couple of minutes you spend on it will pay off when you start using some of the techniques described below!

Stephen

Posted on: October 21, 2017, 6:25 am Category: Uncategorized

Flipping the Classroom and Other Techniques to Improve Teaching

“”Flipping the Classroom and Other Techniques to Improve Teaching” is Inside Higher Ed’s new downloadable compilation of articles.

The booklet, the latest in a series of free, print-on-demand collections, examines how instructors and institutions are experimenting with new approaches to student learning.

On Thursday, Dec. 7, at 2 p.m. EST, Inside Higher Ed’s editors will lead a free webinar to discuss the booklet’s themes. Register for the event here.

This booklet was made possible in part by the advertising support of Top Hat.”

Stephen

Posted on: October 20, 2017, 6:00 am Category: Uncategorized

Nearly half of U.S. teens prefer Snapchat over other social media

Nearly half of U.S. teens prefer Snapchat over other social media

“Snapchat is more popular among U.S. teens than ever, according to new research from investment firm Piper Jaffray. The company surveys teens in the U.S. about their media habits every spring and fall.

This fall’s survey found that 47 percent of surveyed teens say Snapchat is their preferred social media, up from 39 percent in the spring. Way back in the spring of 2015, Snapchat was their least preferred social media platform. And Instagram hasn’t been the most popular platform since 2015, according to the survey data.

Recently Snapchat has seen increased pressure from Instagram, which, along with parent Facebook, has been copying Snapchat’s features. The move has been paying off as Instagram has eaten away at Snapchat’s share of new users in the U.S., according to data from Adobe.

Snapchat, however, is still tops for teens:

For its latest report, Piper Jaffray surveyed 6,100 U.S. teens in 44 states who had an average age of 16 during fall 2017. The survey, distributed through teachers, includes teens both from average-income households ($55,000) and high-income households ($101,000), so the average household income for a teen in the study was $66,100, slightly above the national median.”

Stephen

Posted on: October 19, 2017, 6:01 am Category: Uncategorized

Knowing the Difference Between What’s Urgent and What’s Important

Knowing the Difference Between What’s Urgent and What’s Important

http://blog.lucidea.com/knowing-the-difference-between-whats-urgent-and-whats-important

Stephen

Posted on: October 18, 2017, 6:26 am Category: Uncategorized