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MY WORST FEAR AS A LIBRARIAN

Via The Librarian Problems Blog:
Stephen

Posted on: September 18, 2014, 11:33 am Category: Uncategorized

THE E-COMMERCE DEMOGRAPHICS REPORT: Men Turn Out To Be The Real Mobile Power Shoppers, Not Women

THE E-COMMERCE DEMOGRAPHICS REPORT: Men Turn Out To Be The Real Mobile Power Shoppers, Not Women

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-demographics-of-e-commerce-shoppers-2014-8#ixzz3C4Kck8Wv

bii ecommerce attitudes2

“Here are the surprising facts about men’s e-commerce and mobile commerce habits:

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-demographics-of-e-commerce-shoppers-2014-8#ixzz3C4Krh3Gq

Stephen

Posted on: September 18, 2014, 7:03 am Category: Uncategorized

Defining Unique Learning Outcomes and Measuring Student Success

Cengage Market Insight Paper:

Defining Unique Learning Outcomes and Measuring Student Success

http://assets.cengage.com/pdf/mi_learning_outcomes.pdf

12 page PDF

Stephen

Posted on: September 18, 2014, 6:32 am Category: Uncategorized

6 Ways To Become a Power User of the Public Library

6 Ways To Become a Power User of the Public Library

http://bookriot.com/2014/08/22/power-library-user/

Good list!

1. Get to the top of the holds list for hot titles

2. Request titles for purchase

3. Make use of the Interlibrary Loan System – and respect it

4. Get to Know Your Databases

5. Know the Special Collections 

6. Get Book Recommendations

Read more:

http://bookriot.com/2014/08/22/power-library-user/

Stephen

Posted on: September 18, 2014, 6:28 am Category: Uncategorized

The Geography of Foreign Students in U.S. Higher Education: Origins and Destinations

The Geography of Foreign Students in U.S. Higher Education: Origins and Destinations
Source: Brookings Institution

Via Gary Price: http://fulltextreports.com/2014/08/29/the-geography-of-foreign-students-in-u-s-higher-education-origins-and-destinations/

“This report uses a new database on foreign student visa approvals from 2001 to 2012 to analyze their distribution in the United States, finding that:

  • The number of foreign students on F-1 visas in U.S. colleges and universities grew dramatically from 110,000 in 2001 to 524,000 in 2012. The sharpest increases occurred among students from emerging economies such as China and Saudi Arabia. Foreigners studying for bachelor’s and master’s degrees and English language training accounted for most of the overall growth.
  • Foreign students are concentrated in U.S. metropolitan areas. From 2008 to 2012, 85 percent of foreign students pursuing a bachelor’s degree or above attended colleges and universities in 118 metro areas that collectively accounted for 73 percent of U.S. higher education students. They contributed approximately $21.8 billion in tuition and $12.8 billion in other spending—representing a major services export—to those metropolitan economies over the five-year period.
  • Most foreign students come from large fast-growing cities in emerging markets. Ninety-four (94) foreign cities together accounted for more than half of all students on an F-1 visa between 2008 and 2012. Seoul, Beijing, Shanghai, Hyderabad and Riyadh are the five foreign cities that sent the most higher education students to the United States during that time.
  • Foreign students disproportionately study STEM and business fields. Two-thirds of foreign students pursuing a bachelor’s or higher degree are in science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) or business, management and marketing fields, versus 48 percent of students in the United States. Both large (San Jose, Calif.) and small (Beaumont-Port Arthur, Texas) metro areas figure among those with the highest shares of their foreign students in STEM disciplines.
  • Forty-five (45) percent of foreign student graduates extend their visas to work in the same metropolitan area as their college or university. Metro areas that retain high shares of their foreign graduates under the temporary Optional Practical Training (OPT) program tend to be either large diversified economies (e.g., New York, Los Angeles), or specialized labor markets that align closely with foreign graduates’ training (e.g., Honolulu, Seattle, Las Vegas).”

Stephen

Posted on: September 17, 2014, 6:59 am Category: Uncategorized

Being Mobile at the library…

The library idea in this chart . . . how many of these access points does your library support for transactions like circulation, fines, ILL, etc.?  Being mobile as a service paradigm has gotten more complex… CHART: This Is How People Use Mobile Payments Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-this-is-how-people-use-mobile-payments-2014-9#ixzz3CA1gaqEJ 2014_09_01_Mobile_Payment Stephen

Posted on: September 17, 2014, 6:27 am Category: Uncategorized

The Top Ten Reasons Why Apple Rejects Apps

For those folks developing library apps:

The Top Ten Reasons Why Apple Rejects Apps

http://gizmodo.com/the-top-ten-reasons-why-apple-rejects-apps-1629210034

“Some of the mystery behind Apple’s app rejection decisions has been solved. Now, the powers-that-be behind the App Store have finally revealed why software is so often rejected. You might be surprised by how mundane its reason are.

Apple’s new Common App Rejections page explains the top ten reasons why apps were rejected at the end of August 2014. Here’s the run-down:

14% : More information needed

8% : Guideline 2.2: Apps that exhibit bugs will be rejected

6%: Did not comply with terms in the Developer Program License Agreement

6% : Guideline 10.6: Apple and our customers place a high value on simple, refined, creative, well thought through interfaces. They take more work but are worth it. Apple sets a high bar. If your user interface is complex or less than very good, it may be rejected

5%: Guideline 3.3: Apps with names, descriptions, or screenshots not relevant to the App content and functionality will be rejected

5%: Guideline 22.2: Apps that contain false, fraudulent or misleading representations or use names or icons similar to other Apps will be rejected

4%: Guideline 3.4: App names in iTunes Connect and as displayed on a device should be similar, so as not to cause confusion

4%: Guideline 3.2: Apps with placeholder text will be rejected

3%: Guideline 3.8: Developers are responsible for assigning appropriate ratings to their Apps. Inappropriate ratings may be changed/deleted by Apple

2%: Guideline 2.9: Apps that are “beta”, “demo”, “trial”, or “test” versions will be rejected

The page also provides a series of tips for app developers, like ensuring no links are ever broken, that there’s no place-holder content and a bunch more, too. Go take a read. [Common App Rejections via Cult of Mac]

Image by Massie under Creative Commons license”

Stephen

Posted on: September 16, 2014, 6:25 am Category: Uncategorized