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Creative Commons: “A New Vision, Strategy & Roadmap for 2019”

Creative Commons: “A New Vision, Strategy & Roadmap for 2019” For CC Search Shared in New Blog Post

https://www.infodocket.com/2019/03/19/creative-commons-a-new-vision-strategy-roadmap-for-2019-for-cc-search-shared-in-new-blog-post/

“From a Post by Jane Park, Director of Product and Research, Creative Commons:

At A Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain at the Internet Archive, I teased a new product vision for CC Search that gets more specific than our ultimate goal of providing access to all 1.4 billion CC licensed and public domain works on the web. I’m pleased to present that refined vision, which is focused on building a product that promotes not just discovery, but reuse of openly-licensed and public domain works. We want your feedback in making it a reality. What kinds of images do you most need and desire to reuse when creating your own works? Along that vein, what organizational collections would you like to see us prioritizing for inclusion? Where can we make the biggest difference for you and your fellow creators?

Our 2019 vision is:

“CC Search is a leading tool for creators looking to discover and reuse free resources with greater ease and confidence.”

The vision centers on reuse — CC will prioritize and build for users who seek to not only discover free resources in the commons, but who seek to reuse these resources with greater ease and confidence, and for whom in particular the rights status of these works may be important. This approach means that CC will shift from its “quantity first” approach (front door to 1.4 billion works) to prioritizing content that is more relevant and engaging to creators.

The base catalog is the database of all CC works we are continuing to gather and grow. We envision users will be able to access this catalog in three ways:

  1. Through CC Search — the default front end you see now.
  2. Through some curation on CC Search — you could imagine different portals for different kinds of users, e.g. educators seeking open textbooks.
  3. Through CC Search being integrated directly into other sites and software via a CC API, e.g. CC Search in Google Docs.

Read the Complete Blog Post, View Charts

Direct to Complete CC Search Roadmap

Stephen

 

Stephen

Posted on: March 26, 2019, 6:59 am Category: Uncategorized

Awesome Inspiration: 50 Times Libraries Surprised Everyone With Their Creativity And Sense Of Humor (New Pics)

Awesome Inspiration: 50 Times Libraries Surprised Everyone With Their Creativity And Sense Of Humor (New Pics)

50 Times Libraries Surprised Everyone With Their Creativity And Sense Of Humor (New Pics)

 

Posted on: March 26, 2019, 6:12 am Category: Uncategorized

THE DISINFORMATION PROBLEM STARTS AT HOME

THE DISINFORMATION PROBLEM STARTS AT HOME

https://www.wired.com/story/disinformation-domestic-problem/

Wired Magazine: “The prominence of domestically generated disinformation, and the capacity for this content to influence public policy and even swing elections, necessitates that we do more to safeguard against these threats. The health of our democracy depends on it.”

Stephen

Posted on: March 26, 2019, 6:02 am Category: Uncategorized

“Seeking, Reading, and Use of Scholarly Articles: An International Study of Perceptions and Behavior of Researchers”

Journal Article: “Seeking, Reading, and Use of Scholarly Articles: An International Study of Perceptions and Behavior of Researchers”

“The following article was published today by Publications.

Title

Seeking, Reading, and Use of Scholarly Articles: An International Study of Perceptions and Behavior of Researchers

Authors

Carol Tenopir
University of Tennessee

Lisa Christian
University of Tennessee

Jordan Kaufman
University of Tennessee

Source

Publications 2019
7(1), 18
DOI: 10.3390/publications7010018 

Abstract

While journal articles are still considered the most important sources of scholarly reading, libraries may no longer have a monopoly on providing discovery and access. Many other sources of scholarly information are available to readers. This international study examines how researchers discover, read, and use scholarly literature for their work. Respondents in 2018 report an average of almost 20 article readings a month and there are still significant differences found in the reading and use of scholarly literature by discipline and geographical location, consistent with the earlier studies. Researchers show they are willing to change or adopt new strategies to discover and obtain articles.

Source: Publications 2019, 7(1), 18

 

Source: Publications 2019, 7(1), 18

Direct to Full Text Article (HTML) ||| PDF (23 pages)

Stephen

Posted on: March 25, 2019, 6:57 am Category: Uncategorized

Latest Data Shows Increase to U.S. Economy from Arts and Cultural Sector

Latest Data Shows Increase to U.S. Economy from Arts and Cultural Sector

“From the National Endowment for the Arts (Full Text):

The arts and cultural sector contributed $804.2 billion or 4.3 percent to the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2016. This represents an increase of .1 percent from 2015 when economists reported that the sector added 4.2 percent or $763.6 billion to the U.S. economy. The 4.3 percent contribution for 2016 is part of the latest report of the Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ACPSA), produced by the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the Office of Research & Analysis at the National Endowment for the Arts.

The ACPSA tracks the annual economic impact of arts and cultural production from 35 industries, both commercial and nonprofit. Those 35 industries range from architectural services to sound recording and in whole or in varying percentages are considered to be a distinct sector of the nation’s economy. The ACPSA reports on economic measures—value-added to GDP as well as employment and compensation, revealing that five million people are employed in the arts and cultural sector. Those five million wage-and-salary workers earned $386 billion in 2016.

“For the past five years, the partnership between the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the National Endowment for the Arts has yielded invaluable information about the economic impact of arts and culture,” said Acting Chairman Mary Anne Carter. “The data has consistently demonstrated the value of the arts to the nation, to individual states, and to the lives of the American people.”

Key national findings from this year’s ACPSA are:

  • Arts and culture play a significant role in the economic activity of the country. The value-added to GDP by arts and cultural production is nearly five times greater than that of the agricultural sector. Arts and culture adds nearly $60 billion more than construction and $227 billion more than transportation and warehousing to the U.S. economy.
  • Arts and cultural goods create a trade surplus. In 2016, the U.S. exported nearly $25 billion more in arts and cultural goods and services than it imported, a 12-fold increase over 10 years.
  • ACPSA exports are driven by movies and TV programs, advertising, and arts-related software such as video games.
  • The average annual growth rate for arts and culture outperforms the growth rate of the total U.S. economy. From 2014 to 2016, the average annual growth rate in the contribution of arts and culture was 4.16 percent, nearly double the 2.22 percent growth rate of the total U.S. economy.
  • Consumer spending of the performing arts has risen significantly. Between 1998 and 2016, the rate of consumer spending on performing arts admissions more than doubled, rising from 0.12 percent of U.S. GDP in 1998 to 0.26 percent, totaling $32.7 billion, in 2016.

Key state findings from this year’s ACPSA are:

Thirteen states had an average annual growth rate above the national average of 5.9 percent, as measured over the three-year period of 2014 to 2016. Listed in order, these states were the fastest-growing for the percentage of their gross state product coming from arts and cultural industries.

Rank and Average Annual Growth Rate: 2014-2016

1. Washington State:11.9 percent
2. Georgia:11.1 percent
3. Utah:10.2 percent
4. Nevada: 9.8 percent
5. California: 7.8 percent
6. *Tennessee: 7.8 percent
7.  New Mexico: 7.7 percent
8. *South Carolina: 7.5 percent
9.  Florida: 7.1 percent
10. *Montana: 6.6 percent
11. Oregon: 6.5 percent
12. Colorado: 6.3 percent
13. Massachusetts: 6.2 percent

*These states are identified as rural by the Bureau of Economic Analysis because 30 percent or more of the state’s population live in rural areas. To learn about how arts and culture impact the economies of rural states, go to the Rural Prosperity report below.

Resources

Stephen

Posted on: March 25, 2019, 6:54 am Category: Uncategorized

New research shows how The New York Times, Economist, New Yorker and other top online subscription publishers stack up

New research shows how The New York Times, Economist, New Yorker and other top online subscription publishers stack up

https://www.businessinsider.com/only-a-few-publishers-will-be-able-to-sell-subscriptions-at-scale-2019-3

This chart shows the breakdown of subscriptions among those who subscribe to an online publication.

Which online publications do you subscribe toHow many subscriptions do you have (1)What's your opinion of the cost of online news subscriptions (2)

 

 

online news subscription 1

 

 

Stephen

Posted on: March 25, 2019, 6:49 am Category: Uncategorized

What is your business communication style?

What is your business communication style?

https://www.nextiva.com/blog/business-communication-styles.html#flowchart

infographic that explores the different kinds of business communication styles

Posted on: March 24, 2019, 6:56 am Category: Uncategorized