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ProQuest Study: Librarians on Information Literacy

ProQuest Study: Librarians on Information Literacy 

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2017/01/06/study-librarians-information-literacy

“Only about one-quarter of librarians say their libraries support information literacy instruction, even though virtually all of them believe it has a positive impact on graduation rates and success in the work force, a new study by the library-service provider ProQuest found. The 217 high school and college librarians surveyed also said they aren’t sure if library visitors understand the importance of being able to find, analyze and incorporate information — only 21.2 percent of the respondents said so, compared to the 34.1 percent who disagreed. While most of the surveyed librarians (90.8 percent) said they teach information literacy skills through one-on-one sessions with visitors, many librarians (42.4 percent) said they lack a way of assessing visitors’ level of information literacy.”

Stephen

Posted on: January 23, 2017, 6:12 am Category: Uncategorized

PEW: Internet/Broadband Fact Sheet

Internet/Broadband Fact Sheet

Internet/Broadband Fact Sheet

The internet represents a fundamental shift in how Americans connect with one another, gather information and conduct their day-to-day lives. For more than 15 years, Pew Research Center has documented its growth and distribution in the United States. Explore the patterns of internet and home broadband adoption below.

Internet use over time

When Pew Research Center began systematically tracking Americans’ internet usage in early 2000, about half of all adults were already online. Today, roughly nine-in-ten American adults use the internet.

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% of U.S. adults who use the internet2000200220042006200820102012201420160255075100

Source: Surveys conducted 2000-2016. Data for each year based on a pooled analysis of all surveys conducted during that year.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Who uses the internet

For some demographic groups – such as young adults, college graduates and those from high-income households – internet usage is near ubiquitous. Even so, adoption gaps remain based on factors such as age, income, education and community type.

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% of U.S. adults who use the internet, by age18-2930-4950-6465+2000200220042006200820102012201420160255075100

Source: Surveys conducted 2000-2016. Data for each year based on a pooled analysis of all surveys conducted during that year.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Home broadband use over time

The proportion of American adults with high-speed broadband service at home increased rapidly between 2000 and 2010. In recent years, however, broadband adoption growth has been much more sporadic. Today, roughly three-quarters of American adults have broadband internet service at home.

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% of U.S. adults who are home broadband users20022004200620082010201220142016020406080

Source: Surveys conducted 2000-2016.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Who has home broadband

As is true of internet adoption more broadly, home broadband adoption varies across demographic groups. Racial minorities, older adults, rural residents, and those with lower levels of education and income are less likely to have broadband service at home.

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% of U.S. adults who are home broadband users, by age18-2930-4950-6465+200220042006200820102012201420160255075100

Source: Surveys conducted 2000-2016.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Smartphone dependency over time

As the adoption of traditional broadband service has slowed in recent years, a growing share of Americans now use smartphones as their primary means of online access at home. Today just over one-in-ten American adults are “smartphone-only” internet users – meaning they own a smartphone, but do not have traditional home broadband service.

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% of U.S. adults who do not use broadband at home but own smartphones201320142015201601020304050

Source: Surveys conducted 2013-2016. Data for each year based on a pooled analysis of all surveys containing broadband and smartphone questions fielded during that year.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Who is smartphone dependent

Reliance on smartphones for online access is especially common among younger adults, non-whites and lower-income Americans.

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% of U.S. adults who do not use broadband at home but own smartphones, byage18-2930-4950-6465+20132014201520160204060

Source: Surveys conducted 2013-2016. Data for each year based on a pooled analysis of all surveys containing broadband and smartphone questions fielded during that year.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Find out more

Find more in-depth explorations of home broadband patterns in the U.S. by following the links below.

13% of Americans don’t use the internet. Who are they? Sept. 7, 2016
Home Broadband 2015: Barriers to broadband adoption Dec. 21, 2015
Social Media Usage: 2005-2015 Oct. 8, 2015

All reports and blog posts related to internet access.”

 

Stephen

Posted on: January 23, 2017, 6:07 am Category: Uncategorized

Emotional Intelligence: The Secret Sauce That Makes A Good Leader

Emotional Intelligence: The Secret Sauce That Makes A Good Leader

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/thomas-buus-madsen/the-secret-sauce-that-mak_b_14079494.html

Stephen

Posted on: January 22, 2017, 6:44 am Category: Uncategorized

PEW: Social Media Fact Sheet

Social Media Fact Sheet

http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/social-media/

“Today around seven-in-ten Americans use social media to connect with one another, engage with news content, share information and entertain themselves. Explore the patterns and trends shaping the social media landscape over the past decade below.

Social media use over time

When Pew Research Center began tracking social media adoption in 2005, just 5% of American adults used at least one of these platforms. By 2011 that share had risen to half of all Americans, and today 69% of the public uses some type of social media.

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% of U.S. adults who use at least one social media site200620082010201220142016020406080May 11, 2008U.S. adults: 21%

Source: Surveys conducted 2005-2016.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Who uses social media

As more Americans have adopted social media, the social media user base has also grown more representative of the broader population. Young adults were among the earliest social media adopters and continue to use these sites at high levels, but usage by older adults has increased in recent years.

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% of U.S. adults who use at least one social media site, by age18-2930-4950-6465+2006200820102012201420160255075100Aug 31, 200618-29: 41%

Source: Surveys conducted 2005-2016.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Which social media platforms are most popular

Facebook is the most-widely used of the major social media platforms, and its user base is most broadly representative of the population as a whole. Smaller shares of Americans use sites such as Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and LinkedIn.

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% of U.S. adults who use …FacebookPinterestInstagramLinkedInTwitterJan ’13Jul ’13Jan ’14Jul ’14Jan ’15Jul ’15Jan ‘160255075100

Source: Surveys conducted 2012-2016.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Who uses each social media platform

Usage of the major social media platforms varies by factors such as age, gender and educational attainment.

% of U.S. adults who use each social media platform

Note: Race/ethnicity breaks not shown due to sample size.
Source: Survey conducted March 7-April 4, 2016.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

How often Americans use social media sites

For many users, social media is part of their daily routine. Roughly three-quarters of Facebook users – and around half of Instagram users – visit these sites at least once a day.

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Among the users of each social media site, the % who use that site with thefollowing frequencies72233435115262431317651422518DailyWeeklyLess oftenFacebookInstagramTwitterPinterestLinkedIn0102030405060708090100

Note: Numbers may not add to 100 due to rounding.
Source: Survey conducted March 7-April 4, 2016.

PEW RESEARCH CENTER

Find out more

Follow these links for more in-depth analysis of the impact of social media on American life.

Social Media Update 2016 Nov. 11, 2016
The Political Environment on Social Media Oct. 25, 2016
Social Media Usage: 2005-2015 Oct. 8, 2015

All reports and blog posts related to social media

Stephen

 

Posted on: January 22, 2017, 6:02 am Category: Uncategorized

Engage Your Community when Planning for Change

Engage Your Community when Planning for Change

Find out strategies for assessing community needs, making plans and implementing new ideas

http://www.webjunction.org/news/webjunction/engaged-planning-webinar-writeup.html

“In the recent webinar Engaged Planning: Ask What You Can Do For Your Rural Community, Cindy Fesemyer, Director, Columbus (WI) Public Library, led us through her public library’s process to assess community needs, make plans and implement new ideas. This is no small task. And, no greater opportunity. This process can feel daunting, so Fesemyer shared her journey and some practical ways to get started and make new connections.

Much of Fesemyer’s experience was influenced by ALA’s Libraries Transforming Communities initiative, the Aspen Institute Dialog on Public libraries report: Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries and the Harwood Institute—and rightly so! These reports and tools provide great resources to learn and to get started.”

Watch the full webinar recording for free at any time to learn more from Fesemyer.

Stephen

 

 

Posted on: January 21, 2017, 6:49 am Category: Uncategorized

HBR: The Pros and Cons of Pros-and-Cons Lists

The Pros and Cons of Pros-and-Cons Lists

https://hbr.org/2017/01/the-pros-and-cons-of-pros-and-cons-lists

“The Pros

Rigor. Making the effort to think through all possible pros and cons of a given course of action, and then capturing them in writing, minimizes the likelihood that critical factors have been missed. Assigning weights to each of the pros and cons is an additional exercise that promotes deeper thinking and presumably leads to better-quality decision making.

Emotional distance. Important decisions are likely to evoke powerful emotions. Going through the steps of creating a pros-and-cons list can create what researchers Ozlem Ayduk and Ethan Kross refer to as a “self-distanced perspective,” in which the decision is viewed as an “external” problem to be addressed, easing the impact of the emotions surrounding the decision. Deferring the decision pending the pro-con analysis also provides a gap in time in which powerful emotions can dissipate, reducing the risk of an “amygdala hijack,” the cognitive phenomenon popularized by Daniel Goleman’s emotional intelligence writings, in which perceived emotional threats can lead to extreme actions, often with undesirable outcomes.

Familiarity and simplicity. Perhaps most compelling of all, the pros-and-cons list is generally well understood, requires no special computational or analytical expertise, and is elegantly simple to administer.

The Cons

Vulnerable to cognitive biases. Cognitive biases are common patterns of thinking that have been demonstrated to lead to errors in judgment and poor decision making. Unfortunately, the same simplicity that makes a pros-and-cons list so appealing creates many opportunities for a host of cognitive biases to emerge, including:

  • Framing effect. Pros-and-cons lists generally are about evaluating two alternatives: a “thumbs up or thumbs down” scenario and an example of “narrow framing,” a bias created by overly constraining the set of possible outcomes.
  • Overconfidence effect. A well-established cognitive bias is the tendency of individuals to overestimate the reliability of their judgments. When creating a pros-and-cons lists, it is likely that many people assume a level of accuracy in their assessment of pros and cons that simply isn’t there.
  • Illusion of control. When faced with the task of envisioning possible outcomes, a common bias is to believe that one can control outcomes that in reality are not controllable.

Reliance on analytical thinking.

The Verdict . . .”

https://hbr.org/2017/01/the-pros-and-cons-of-pros-and-cons-lists

Stephen

Posted on: January 21, 2017, 6:15 am Category: Uncategorized

The 10 Personas of an Effective Brainstorm Facilitator

The 10 Personas of an Effective Brainstorm Facilitator

http://www.ideachampions.com/weblogs/archives/2017/01/einstein_brains_1.shtml

“1.CONDUCTOR
A skilled brainstorm facilitator knows how to orchestrate powerfully creative output from a seemingly dissonant group of people. In the conductor mode, the facilitator includes everyone, evokes even the subtlest contributions from the least experienced participant, and demonstrates their commitment to the whole by offering timely feedback to anyone who “gets lost in their own song.”

2.ALCHEMIST
A good brainstorm facilitator is able to transmute lead into gold — or in modern terms — knows how to help people “get the lead out.” This talent requires an element of wizardry — the ability to see without looking, feel without touching, and intuitively know that within each brainstormer lives a hidden genius just waiting to get out.

3.DANCER
Light on their feet, brainstorm facilitators move gracefully through the process of sparking new ideas. Able to go from the cha-cha to the polka to the whirling dervish spinning of a brainstorm group on fire, savvy facilitators take bold steps when necessary, even when there is no visible ground underfoot. “The path is made by walking on it,” is their motto.

4. MAD SCIENTIST
Skillful brainstorm facilitators are bold experimenters, often taking on the crazed (but grandfatherly) look of an Einstein in heat. While respecting the realm of logic and the rational (the ground upon which most scientists build their homes), the enlightened facilitator is willing to throw it all out the window in the hope of triggering a “happy accident” or a quantum leap of thought. Indeed, it is often these discontinuous non-linear moments that produce the kind of breakthroughs that logic can only describe, never elicit itself.

5.DIAMOND CUTTER
Fully recognizing the precious gem of the human imagination (as well as the delicacy required to set it free), the high octave brainstorm facilitator is a craftsman (or craftswoman) par excellence — focused, precise, and dedicated. Able to get to the heart of the matter in a single stroke without leaving anything or anyone damaged in the process.

6. ACTOR
Brainstorm facilitators are “on stage” whether they like it or not. All eyes are upon them, as well as all the potential critical reviews humanly possible. More often than not, the facilitator’s “audience” will only be moved to act (perchance to dream) if they believe the facilitator is completely into his or her role. If the audience does not suspend this kind of disbelief, the play will close early and everyone will be praying for a fire drill or wishing they were back home eating a grilled cheese sandwich.

7.ENVIRONMENTALIST
Brainstorm facilitators are the original recyclers. In their relentless pursuit of possibility, they look for value in places other people see as useless. To the facilitator in full mojo mode, “bad ideas” aren’t always bad, only curious indicators that something of untapped value is lurking nearby.

8. OFFICER OF THE LAW
One of the brainstorm facilitator’s most important jobs is to enforce “law and order” once the group gets roaring down the open highway of the imagination. This is a fine art — for in this territory speeding is encouraged, as is running red lights, jaywalking, and occasionally breaking and entering. Just as thieves have their code of honor, however, so too should brainstormers. Indeed, it is the facilitator’s task to keep this code intact — a task made infinitely easier by the ritual declaration of ground rules at the start of a session.”

9.SERVANT
Some brainstorm facilitators, intoxicated by the group energy and their own newly stimulated imagination, use their position as a way to foist their ideas on others — or worse, manipulate the group into their way of thinking. Oops! Ouch! Aargh! Brainstorm facilitating is a service, not a personal platform. It is supposed to be a selfless act that enables others to arrive at their own solutions — no matter how different they may be from the facilitator’s.

10. STAND-UP COMIC
Humor is one of the brainstorm facilitator’s most important tools. It dissolves boundaries, activates the right brain, helps participants get unstuck, and shifts perspective just enough to help everyone open their eyes to new ways of seeing. Trained facilitators are always on the lookout for humorous responses. They know that humor often signals some of the most promising ideas, and that giggles, guffaws, and laughable side-talk frequently indicate a rich vein of possibility to explore. Humor also makes the facilitator much more “likable” which makes the group they are facilitating more amenable to their direction. Ever wonder why the words “Aha!” and “Ha-Ha” are so similar?

Our brainstorm facilitation website

VIDEO: The 8 Dimensions of a Brainstorm Session

 

Stephen

Posted on: January 20, 2017, 6:46 am Category: Uncategorized