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Internet of Things will change everything

Internet of Things will change everything

http://www.mobileindustryreview.com/2014/11/internet-of-things.html

Internet of Things - Mainstream

Internet of Things - Usage

Internet of Things - Concerns

 

Stephen

Posted on: November 24, 2014, 6:06 am Category: Uncategorized

PEW: Public Perceptions of Privacy and Security in the Post-Snowden Era”

Public Perceptions of Privacy and Security in the Post-Snowden Era

http://www.infodocket.com/2014/11/12/new-pew-internet-report-looks-at-perceptions-and-attitudes-on-privacy-and-government-surveillance-in-the-u-s/

Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket

Privacy evokes a constellation of concepts for Americans—some of them tied to traditional notions of civil liberties and some of them driven by concerns about the surveillance of digital communications and the coming era of “big data.” While Americans’ associations with the topic of privacy are varied, the majority of adults in a new survey by the Pew Research Center feel that their privacy is being challenged along such core dimensions as the security of their personal information and their ability to retain confidentiality.

Privacy word cloud

When Americans are asked what comes to mind when they hear the word “privacy,” there are patterns to their answers. As the above word cloud illustrates, they give important weight to the idea that privacy applies to personal material—their space, their “stuff,” their solitude, and, importantly, their “rights.” Beyond the frequency of individual words, when responses are grouped into themes, the largest block of answers ties to concepts of security, safety, and protection. For many others, notions of secrecy and keeping things “hidden” are top of mind when thinking about privacy.

Most are aware of government efforts to monitor communications

More than a year after contractor Edward Snowden leaked documents about widespread government surveillance by the NSA, the cascade of news stories about the revelations continue to register widely among the public. Some 43% of adults have heard “a lot” about “the government collecting information about telephone calls, emails, and other online communications as part of efforts to monitor terrorist activity,” and another 44% have heard “a little.” Just 5% of adults in our panel said they have heard “nothing at all” about these programs.

Widespread concern about surveillance by government and businesses

Perhaps most striking is Americans’ lack of confidence that they have control over their personal information. That pervasive concern applies to everyday communications channels and to the collectors of their information—both in the government and in corporations. For example:

Yet, even as Americans express concern about government access to their data, they feel as though government could do more to regulate what advertisers do with their personal information:

In the commercial context, consumers are skeptical about some of the benefits of personal data sharing, but are willing to make tradeoffs in certain circumstances when their sharing of information provides access to free services.

There is little confidence in the security of common communications channels, and those who have heard about government surveillance programs are the least confident

The public feels most secure using landline phones, least secure on social media Across the board, there is a universal lack of confidence among adults in the security of everyday communications channels—particularly when it comes to the use of online tools. Across six different methods of mediated communication, there is not one mode through which a majority of the American public feels “very secure” when sharing private information with another trusted person or organization:

  • 81% feel “not very” or “not at all secure” using social media sites when they want to share private information with another trusted person or organization.
  • 68% feel insecure using chat or instant messages to share private information.
  • 58% feel insecure sending private info via text messages.
  • 57% feel insecure sending private information via email.
  • 46% feel “not very” or “not at all secure” calling on their cell phone when they want to share private information.
  • 31% feel “not very” or “not at all secure” using a landline phone when they want to share private information.

Americans’ lack of confidence in core communications channels tracks closely with how much they have heard about government surveillance programs. For five out of the six communications channels we asked about, those who have heard “a lot” about government surveillance are significantly more likely than those who have heard just “a little” or “nothing at all” to consider the method to be “not at all secure” for sharing private information with another trusted person or organization.

Most say they want to do more to protect their privacy, but many believe it is not possible to be anonymous online

When it comes to their own role in managing the personal information they feel is sensitive, most adults express a desire to take additional steps to protect their data online: When asked if they feel as though their own efforts to protect the privacy of their personal information online are sufficient, 61% say they feel they “would like to do more,” while 37% say they “already do enough.”

Just 24% of adults “agree” or “strongly agree” with the statement: “It is easy for me to be anonymous when I am online.”

When they want to have anonymity online, few feel that is easy to achieve. Just 24% of adults “agree” or “strongly agree” with the statement: “It is easy for me to be anonymous when I am online.”

Not everyone monitors their online reputation very vigilantly, even though many assume others will check up on their digital footprints

Some people are more anxious than others to keep track of their online reputation. Adults under the age of 50 are far more likely to be “self-searchers” than those ages 50 and older, and adults with higher levels of household income and education stand out as especially likely to check up on their own digital footprints.

  • 62% adults have ever used a search engine to look up their own name or see what information about them is on the internet.
  • 47% say they generally assume that people they meet will search for information about them on the internet, while 50% do not.
  • However, just 6% of adults have set up some sort of automatic alert to notify them when their name is mentioned in a news story, blog, or elsewhere online.

Context matters as people decide whether to disclose information or not

One of the ways that people cope with the challenges to their privacy online is to employ multiple strategies for managing identity and reputation across different networks and transactions. As previous findings from the Pew Research Center have suggested, users bounce back and forth between different levels of disclosure depending on the context. This survey also finds that when people post comments, questions or other information, they do so using a range of identifiers—using a screen name, their actual name, or posting anonymously.

Among all adults:

  • 59% have posted comments, questions or other information online using a user name or screen name that people associate with them.
  • 55% have done so using their real name.
  • 42% have done so anonymously.

In some cases, the choices people make about disclosure may be tied to work-related policies. Among employed adults:

  • 24% of employed adults say that their employer has rules or guidelines about how they are allowed to present themselves online.
  • 11% say that their job requires them to promote themselves through social media or other online tools.

Different types of information elicit different levels of sensitivity among Americans

Social security numbers are universally considered to be the most sensitive piece of personal information, while media tastes and purchasing habits are among the least sensitive categories of data.

Social security numbers, health info and phone conversations among the most sensitive data

At the same time that Americans express these broad sensitivities toward various kinds of information, they are actively engaged in negotiating the benefits and risks of sharing this data in their daily interactions with friends, family, co-workers, businesses and government. And even as they feel concerned about the possibility of misinformation circulating online, relatively few report negative experiences tied to their digital footprints.

  • 11% of adults say they have had any bad experiences because embarrassing or inaccurate information was posted about them online.
  • 16% say they have asked someone to remove or correct information about them that was posted online.”

 http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/11/12/public-privacy-perceptions/pi_2014-11-12_privacy-perceptions_01/

Stephen

Posted on: November 23, 2014, 6:57 am Category: Uncategorized

Video: Apps for Librarians

Apps for Librarians: Digital Literacy with mobile apps

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tReWhNa1Sh0

Stephen

Posted on: November 23, 2014, 6:41 am Category: Uncategorized

Infographic: Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web Design

http://www.coolinfographics.com/blog/2014/11/12/responsive-web-design.html

Responsive Web Design infographic

Stephen

Posted on: November 22, 2014, 6:54 am Category: Uncategorized

These Charts Show Just How Far The Newspaper Industry Has Fallen In 10 Years

These Charts Show Just How Far The Newspaper Industry Has Fallen In 10 Years

http://www.businessinsider.com/brookings-essay-on-decline-of-newspapers-2014-10

google

getnews

decline

Timespent

Stephen

Posted on: November 22, 2014, 6:33 am Category: Uncategorized

Top 5 problems with library websites – a review of recent usability studies

Top 5 problems with library websites – a review of recent usability studies

“What are the most common UX problems with academic library websites and library tools?  I looked at 16 studiesconducted over the past two years, and here is what I learned:

1NumberOneInCircleWhat does that mean?  Library jargon

 

2NumberTwoInCircleWhat am I searching?  Understanding search tools

 

128px-3NumberThreeInCircle.svgWhere am I? Getting lost in silos

 

4NumberFourInCircleWhat is it? Understanding bibliographic formats and relationships

 

5NumberFiveInCircleHow do I get it?  Difficulty Finding Full-Text

 

And one bonus problem: 

6NumberSixInCircleWhere is it?  Navigating with tabs”

 

 

Read the details: http://emilysingley.net/top-5-problems-with-library-websites-a-review-of-recent-usability-studies/

Stephen

 

Posted on: November 21, 2014, 6:51 am Category: Uncategorized

Seven Reasons the Flipped Classroom Matters

Seven Reasons the Flipped Classroom Matters

http://blog.cengage.com/seven-reasons-flipped-classroom-matters/

“These principles, and your future flipped class, look like this…

1. Faculty spend less time answering basic questions and more time engaging in activities and discussions that accomplish higher-level learning goals.
2. Students help each other to fill in knowledge gaps using language that makes sense them as peers, and defend their solutions to challenging real-world problems.
3. Structured readings, activities, and discussions enable students to focus more quality time on learning.
4. Students receive consistent feedback during every course meeting and can more readily adapt to achieve success.
5. Students come to class having done the reading, ready to work and become responsible for their own learning.
6. Students spend class time actively and collaboratively solving problems and practicing discipline-specific skills.
7. Working in teams during class enables students to hear alternative viewpoints and bring their individual talents to the discussion.”

Stephen

Posted on: November 21, 2014, 6:38 am Category: Uncategorized