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ROMA is coming up this weekend: The future is rural

The future is rural

“With the cost of living and level of stress associated with city living constantly increasing, people of all ages are realizing that there is a better way. Futurist Jesse Hirsh chats with Municipal World CEO Susan Gardner about Canada’s future, explaining how rural communities are the economic engines of the future.”

ROMA Conference is coming up this weekend and I’ll be there with my ARUPLO colleagues.

Stephen

Posted on: January 22, 2019, 9:50 am Category: Uncategorized

A starter checklist for MIS students getting to know a public library

A starter checklist for MIS students getting to know a public library

Mary Cavanaugh “compiled this checklist as an aid for students in this term’s public libraries course. Each student has been assigned a public library branch and system to follow for the semester. While the list is not comprehensive, it is intended to get students started in doing a deep dive in getting to know their public library. The only access to information students have at their disposal is the library’s online presence – i.e., website, social media channels, as starting point for their background research. ”

Check it out – might be good for any staff orientation.

A starter checklist for MIS students getting to know a public library

Stephen

Posted on: January 22, 2019, 9:44 am Category: Uncategorized

Web Standards: The What, The Why, And The How

Web Standards: The What, The Why, And The How

https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2019/01/web-standards-guide/

Stephen

 

 

Posted on: January 22, 2019, 6:33 am Category: Uncategorized

Poynter/Google: Helping teens root out misinformation and get media savvy

Helping teens root out misinformation and get media savvy

Misinformation is nothing new, but in the digital age, it can spread like a virus. This is especially true for teenagers growing up with mobile phones as an extension of how they engage with the world and their friends. You might think teens are more digitally savvy, but research shows they can just as easily be fooled by misleading online content.

MediaWise helps teens figure out what’s real and what’s not by teaching them fact-checking skills that professional journalists use. I like to think of it this way: if misinformation online is a disease, then MediaWise is the Red Cross. Our work is based on a curriculum the Stanford History Education Group is currently writing and testing, which will be available for any middle school and high school teachers to download online for free this fall.

To kick off the new year, we spoke to 2,000 students and teachers at three schools in Houston, while 3,000 more watched online in class. We introduced them to tools like Reverse Google Image Search to help fact check the origin of a photo, shared tips and tricks on what to look out for, and heard from students and teachers about their concerns and experiences.

At Memorial High School, we spent the day with more than 600 students and had them do their own fact-checking online, using real-world examples of posts (like this one and this one)  on social media. They voted through a live Instagram poll on whether or not they thought a post was legit. Most got the first few examples wrong, but as their fact checking skills improved, got more right.

And at Spring Forest Middle School, less than half the 8th grade class of 300 students could tell whether a viral photo claiming Jason Derulo falling down the stairs at the Met Gala was fake. Afterwards, students said they’ll do more research before sharing information online and felt these skills should be taught in all classrooms by their teachers.

instagram poll

MediaWise wants students to lead this work themselves. Last week, we launched theMediaWise Teen Fact-Checking Network: a stellar crew of 24 students from across the country ranging from 15 to 18 years old. They’ll create original fact-checking videos for YouTube, InstagramFacebook and Twitter to help us reach our target teen audience.

MediaWise multimedia reporters Allison Graves and Hiwot Hailu are leading this squad and guiding them on our quest to “fact-check the Internet.” This crew is the real deal—many work for their high school newspaper or TV station. Madeleine Katz, a 16-year-old from St. Petersburg, Florida with a popular Instagram account reviewing young adult books, joined because she feels strongly about the mission to empower her generation to be informed decision makers. Yasmeen Saadi from Kansas joined because she thinks it’s hard for teens to determine real from fake news on the internet.

MediaWise also partnered with best-selling author John Green to create a 10 part series on his CrashCourse YouTube channel called Navigating Digital Information, which launched last week. Each episode is chock-full of fact-checking tips and tricks and gives a sneak peek into the curriculum that will be available in the fall.

Teens want to learn how to discern fact from fiction online and teachers want new tools to help them teach their students to be smarter consumers of information. If your school is interested in MediaWise, or you want to be a part of the Teen Fact Checking Network, we’d love to hear from you. Check out our website to learn more and if you see something suspect online, tag us on social media with #isthislegit and our handle @MediaWise and we’ll check it out.”

Stephen

Posted on: January 21, 2019, 6:30 am Category: Uncategorized

Report: “The Hunt for the Nazi Loot Still Sitting on Library Shelves”

Report: “The Hunt for the Nazi Loot Still Sitting on Library Shelves”

“From The NY Times:

The hunt for the millions of books stolen by the Nazis during World War II has been pursued quietly and diligently for decades, but it has been largely ignored, even as the search for lost art drew headlines. The plundered volumes seldom carried the same glamour as the looted paintings, which were often masterpieces worth millions of dollars.

But recently, with little fanfare, the search for the books has intensified, driven by researchers in America and Europe who have developed a road map of sorts to track the stolen books, many of which are still hiding in plain sight on library shelves throughout Europe.

Their work has been aided by newly opened archives, the internet, and the growing number of European librarians who have made such searches a priority, researchers say.

“People have looked away for so long,” said Anders Rydell, author of “The Book Thieves: The Nazi Looting of Europe’s Libraries and the Race to Return a Literary Inheritance,” “but I don’t think they can anymore.”

Read the Complete Article, View Images

See Also: The Book Thieves : The Nazi Looting Of Europe’s Libraries And The Race To Return A Literary Inheritance (via WorldCat)”

Stephen

Posted on: January 21, 2019, 6:27 am Category: Uncategorized

Why Reading Books Should Be Your Priority, According to Science

Why Reading Books Should Be Your Priority, According to Science

You’re not doing yourself any favors if you’re in the 26 percent of American adults who haven’t read even part of a book within the past year.

https://www.inc.com/christina-desmarais/why-reading-books-should-be-your-priority-according-to-science.html

Posted on: January 20, 2019, 6:46 am Category: Uncategorized

Foldable phones are the future no one asked for

Foldable phones are the future no one asked for

The reviews aren’t promising and the demand is unclear. Is this really the future?

https://www.salon.com/2019/01/13/touted-as-the-future-foldable-phones-at-ces-fail-to-woo-journalists/

The First Bendable Phone Is an Exciting Piece of Junk

https://gizmodo.com/the-first-bendable-phone-is-an-exciting-piece-of-junk-1831653195

Stephen

Posted on: January 20, 2019, 6:34 am Category: Uncategorized