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Research Libraries: ARL’s Assessment Program Visioning Task Force Releases Recommendations

Research Libraries: ARL’s Assessment Program Visioning Task Force Releases Recommendations

http://www.infodocket.com/2017/12/04/research-libraries-arls-assessment-program-visioning-task-force-releases-recommendations/

“From the Association of Research Libraries (ARL):

There is a strong sense from ARL members that the [Assessment Program] should continue to focus on supporting library assessment in member libraries. However, the needs of ARL member libraries and staff have evolved since the program’s inception, and while the program meets some pressing needs of ARL members, there are distinct gaps between the audiences that the ARL assessment program currently serves and those that ARL members most need the program to serve.

2017-12-04_11-07-03As a first step, the Visioning Task Force was charged to consider all current and potential ARL assessment-related services, including the goals, outcomes, deliverables, staff, and other resources related to the existing metrics and tools, and to the surveys in the StatsQUAL suite. The Association asked the task force to write recommendations—presented in a report released today—for investment, maintenance, and disinvestment of programs, services, and tools as well as for new service areas and foci. In devising the recommendations, the task force considered the types of issues ARL libraries will need to address in their measurement and evaluation program in the context of contemporary movements in higher education.

ARL secured Athenaeum21 Consulting to work with the Visioning Task Force to realize its charge by developing the recommendations for consideration and discussion by the ARL membership. The task force’s report presents the recommendations along with an overview of the discussions, research, and review processes undertaken. The report also sets out a fairly detailed structure for a renewed assessment program that the task force believes will better meet the assessment needs of ARL members.

Direct to Complete Intro Blog Post

Direct to Full Text Report
22 pages; PDF.”

Stephen

Posted on: December 14, 2017, 6:36 am Category: Uncategorized

Engaging with the 2016 Opportunity Index

Engaging with the 2016 Opportunity Index

Engaging with the 2016 Opportunity Index

This is an infographic from the Opportunity Index.

 

Stephen

Posted on: December 14, 2017, 6:28 am Category: Uncategorized

84% OF U.S. HOUSEHOLDS GET AN INTERNET SERVICE AT HOME

DURHAM, NH — Eighty-four percent of U.S. households get an Internet service at home, compared to 83 percent in 2012 and 74 percent in 2007, according to new consumer research from Leichtman Research Group (LRG). Broadband accounts for 98 percent of households with Internet service at home, and 82 percent of all households get a broadband Internet service — an increase from 76 percent in 2012, and 53 percdent in 2007.

In addition, 75 percent of adults access the Internet on a smartphone, up from 44 percent in 2012. Overall, 68 percent of households now get Internet service both at home and on a smartphone, an increase from 59 percent in 2014, and 42 percent in 2012.

These findings are based on a telephone survey of 1,203 households from throughout the United States and are part of a new LRG study, Broadband Internet in the U.S. 2017. This is LRG’s fifteenth annual study on this topic.

Stephen

Posted on: December 14, 2017, 2:30 am Category: Uncategorized

What is Blockchain Technology?

What is Blockchain Technology?

What is Blockchain Technology?

What is Blockchain?

 

Stephen

Posted on: December 13, 2017, 6:38 am Category: Uncategorized

Phablets will become the most popular smartphone type by 2019

Phablets will become the most popular smartphone type by 2019

http://www.businessinsider.com/phablets-smartphones-popularity-2019-2017-12

Smartphone market by screensize

 

Stephen

Posted on: December 13, 2017, 6:25 am Category: Uncategorized

Advocating for Libraries Tips for talking to your legislators

Advocating for Libraries

Tips for talking to your legislators

Advocating for Libraries

“Don’t overestimate what legislators know (or understand) about your cause. Be ready to educate them each legislative session, and do so in engaging ways. Legislators are busy people who get a lot of information thrown at them, often about unfamiliar subjects and issues. Make it simple for legislators to absorb—and remember—your library’s story and why it’s important to their constituents and your state. For example, we have created eye-catching brochures and infographics that clearly illustrate facts, statistics, and issues in a way that is easy to understand and retain. And these materials can be customized with data about a legislator’s district or a particular part of the state.

Research your legislators. Focus your efforts on senators and representatives whose stated goals and interests align the best with the library mission. For example, one of our agency’s strategic goals concerns workforce development, which is also a stated priority for one of our key legislators. In our correspondence with this legislator, we demonstrate specific library and agency programs, services, and assistance that the community uses to spur workforce and economic development. We also include a success story that highlights the issue and the effect the agency and library have on the topic and the community. The story personalizes the subject and makes it more relevant and memorable. And we customize a version of a brochure or infographic to reinforce the topic.

Tailor your message. Find out what messages might resonate with the people who have control over the purse strings and tailor a pitch to each one. This can go a long way toward securing the funding you’re looking for. And be prepared to share that targeted message—anywhere. If you unexpectedly encounter a legislator—maybe in line at your favorite coffee place—introduce yourself and bring up the library.”

Stephen

Posted on: December 12, 2017, 6:48 am Category: Uncategorized

Managing Library Millennials

Managing Library Millennials

Managing Library Millennials

“References

  1. Steve Matthews, “Millennial Library Users Need. . . What?,” 21st Century Library Blog.
  2. Sasha Zhivago, “Millennials have Figured out That Adventurous Experiences Trump Material Goods,” Bit of News, Jan. 19, 2016, accessed June 19, 2017.
  3. Stephanie Cohen, “Will Millennials Kill off Libraries?,” Acculturated, Sept. 15, 2015, accessed Apr. 22, 2016.
  4. Ibid.
  5. Chad Halvorson, “6 Key Principles for Managing Millennials,” When I Work, Apr. 20, 2015, accessed Apr. 22, 2016.
  6. So How Many Millennials Are There in the US, Anyway?,” Marketing Charts, Apr. 28, 2015, accessed June 28, 2017.
  7. Philip Bump, “Here Is When Each Generation Begins and Ends, According to Facts,” The Atlantic, Mar. 25, 2014, accessed Feb. 13, 2017.
  8. Susan M. Heath eld, “11 Tips to Help You Manage Millennials,” The Balance, Sept. 23, 2016, accessed June 28, 2017.
  9. Victoria Stilwell, “Millennials Most-Educated U.S. Age Group after Downturn: Economy,” Bloomberg Markets, Oct. 8, 2014, accessed June 28, 2017.
  10. Lisa Peet, “Pew Report Finds Millennials Are Readers, Library Users,” Library Journal, Sept. 16, 2014, accessed Apr. 22, 2016.
  11. Ibid.
  12. Heath Field, “11 Tips to Help You Manage Millennials.”
  13. Terri Klass and Judy Lindenberger, “Characteristics of Millennials in the Workplace,” Business Know-How, accessed Apr. 22, 2016.
  14. Rob Reuteman, “This Is How Millennials Want to Be Managed.Entrepreneur, Mar. 1, 2015, accessed Apr. 22, 2016.
  15. Klass and Lindenberger, “Characteristics of Millennials in the Workplace.”
  16. Halvorson, “6 Key Principles for Managing Millennials.”
  17. Gini Dietrich, “How to Manage Millennials: Treat Them Like Adults,” Spin Sucks, Apr. 29, 2015, accessed Apr. 22, 2016.
  18. Klass and Lindenberger, “Characteristics of Millennials in the Workplace.”
  19. Reuteman, “This Is How Millennials Want to Be Managed.”
  20. George Bradt, “Trying To Manage Millennials? Give Up and Lead Them Instead,” Forbes, May 27, 2014, accessed Apr. 22, 2016.
  21. Reuteman, “This Is How Millennials Want to Be Managed.””

 

Stephen

Posted on: December 12, 2017, 6:23 am Category: Uncategorized