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MySpace – Facebook Cage Match

MySpace doth protest too much? Their recent press release claiming to be the king of social networking sites is a bit disingenuous.
From Mashable:
“comScore’s latest Media Metrix report indicates that MySpace is losing ground to Facebook for the high school demographic. While MySpace still holds the lead overall, Facebook has increased its number of US visitors under the age of 18 (about 2.5 times), while MySpace has dropped about 30% for the same age group. Not entirely surprising, MySpace is seeing growth for every other age demographic, as is Facebook.”
“What’s this mean? It could mean that MySpace has reached its saturation point for the high school crowd, and every other age group is still playing catch up. With Facebook opening its doors beyond college students and alum, and the applications offering more personalized features, better inherent tools for connecting to each other, Facebook could be the new MySpace. Facebook has, after all, just reached the 30 million member mark.
This also goes against what some have speculated to be a key differentiating factor between MySpace and Facebook, tagging MySpace as a place for high schoolers and Facebook being the place for college students. How this will tie into studies such as Boyd’s which have noted case studies for the socioeconomic differences between the two networks is also yet to be determined, given the current shift in user demographics.”
I wonder if the Murdoch purchase of Dow Jones and WSJ will ultimately affect MySpace. it is already chock-a-block with ads. I hear the average age is 32 there now so it’s a prime market for RRSP’s and 401K’s. Hmmm.
There are other competitors in the space, especially Bebo internationally and Ning for targeted networks.
Then again, when Facebook hits their monetary stride, things could change again. And don’t tell me everyone will abandon social networks because of ads. I still remember the pre-ad web search engines and Internet and don’t see it being any less popular or smaller for its commercialization.
Stephen

Posted on: July 18, 2007, 4:03 pm Category: Uncategorized

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