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Draft report on openness in higher education

The Committee for Economic Development, a longstanding American business-led think tank, has released a draft of its report, Harnessing Openness to Improve Research, Teaching and Learning in Higher Education [102 page PDF].
Table of Contents:
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
I. CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
b. Higher Education .
c. Trends Affecting Higher Education
II. CHAPTER 2. HIGHER EDUCATION AND ITS ADOPTION OF OPENNESS .
a. Open Educational Resources: A Force for Greater Openness in Higher Education
b. “e State of OER Today
c. Teaching and Learning Using Open Educational Resources
III. CHAPTER 3. ISSUES SURROUNDING OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 34
a. Issue: How Should OER be Defined?
b. Issue: “e Perils of a Supply-Side Focus
c. Issue: Locating and Evaluating OER
d. Issue: “e OER Landscape and the Need for Coordinaton
e. Issue: Incentives for Participation in OER Creation and development
f. Issue: Government Support for OER
g. Issue: Intellectual Property Rights and OER Development
h. Issue: “Fair Use” and Educational Exceptions
i. Issue: Intellectual Property Licenses for OER
j. Issue: Standards and Interoperability
k. Issue: Learning About Co-Creation
l. Issue: Sustainability
m. Issue: E-Spaces and E-Portfolios
n. Issue: “e Open Syllabus
IV. CHAPTER 4. COMMUNITY COLLEGES
a. “e Challenges
b. “e Inevitability of an Increase in Online Education
c. Openness and Data Availability
d. A More Open Way to View Grades 9-16
e. Openness and Extending Institutional Resources
f. Openness and Strengthening Community Colleges’ Relationships Business
g. Open Textbooks
h. Broadband Connectivity and Fab Labs
V. CHAPTER 5. OPENNESS IN HIGHER EDUCATION: CHANGES IN RESEARCH
a. Resistance to Greater Openness
b. Openness and Open-Access Journals
c. Digital Repositories
d. Educating Faculty Members on “eir Intellectual Property Rights
e. Openness and Commercial Support of Research
f. Access to Government-Funded Research Results
g. Openness and University Libraries
h. Openness and Academic Presses
i. Openness and Technology Transfer
VI. CHAPTER 6. OTHER APPLICATIONS OF OPENNESS IN HIGHER EDUCATION:
EXTENDED COMMUNITIES AND ADMINISTRATION.
a. Improving Connections to Extended Communities
b. Improving the Administration of Colleges and Universities
c. Openness and the Challenge of Piracy
VII. CHAPTER 7. EVALUATION, CERTIFICATION, ACCREDITATION, COMPATIBILITY,
TRANSPARENCY, AND COMPETITION: WHAT ARE WE MISSING?
a. What Do We Know About Educational Materials and Practices .
b. Degrees and Certificates—What Do they Mean?
c. Accreditation and Reform
d. Openness and Reform
e. “e Emergence of New Forms of Certification
VIII. CHAPTER 8. LESSONS FROM FOR-PROFIT INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION . .
a. Background
b. Mission Clarity
c. Assessment and Learning Outcomes
d. Flexibility and Willingness to Experiment With and Employ New Technologies
e. A Faculty of Practitioners
f. Enhancing Teaching
g. Learning in Groups
h. Openness to Business
IX. CHAPTER 9. CONCLUSION
ENDNOTES
Stephen
Stephen

Posted on: October 23, 2009, 12:22 am Category: Uncategorized

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