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Are Amazon Book Reviews Reliable?

Are Amazon book reviews reliable? Some links worth reading:

Online Book Reviews Are Even Less Reliable Than You Thought

http://gizmodo.com/5938165/online-book-reviews-are-even-less-reliable-than-you-thought

“Skeptical of a little e-book you’ve never heard of that has 28 five-star reviews on Amazon? You should be. Turns out in many cases, the authors are paying for reviews.

The New York Times takes a look at the business of for-hire review writing, through the eyes of Todd Rutherford, a guy who started the now-defunct GettingBookReviews.com, where he churned out reviews at $99 a pop”

How To Read Amazon Review Graphs

http://www.mediabistro.com/galleycat/how-to-read-amazon-review-graphs_b56703

“Frustrated by a rising tide of paid book reviews on Amazon, Reddit user Onewatt created the chart embedded above–do you agree with the breakdown of reviews?”

What Do You Think About Authors Paying for Positive Reviews?

http://blog.nathanbransford.com/2012/08/what-do-you-think-about-authors-paying.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NathanBransford+%28Nathan+Bransford%2C+Author%29

“But what do you think? Do you trust reviews? Is this a practice that should be punished or does it go with the territory? How do you see this playing out?”

Quite a few large libraries use Bibliocommons or LibraryThing for Libraries to solicit and include reviews in their OPACs.  This seems a good thing since usuaallly a library card and firm identity is required to submit and participate.  Libraries also add enhanced reviews from quality sources to their OPACs as well.  Does this mean that user reviews in libraries are more trustworthy than the usual retail book sites?

Stephen

 

Posted on: August 31, 2012, 6:59 am Category: Uncategorized