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WSJ: Most Students Don’t Know When News Is Fake, Stanford Study Finds

Most Students Don’t Know When News Is Fake, Stanford Study Finds

Teens absorb social media news without considering the source; parents can teach research skills and skepticism

http://www.wsj.com/articles/most-students-dont-know-when-news-is-fake-stanford-study-finds-1479752576
“Does children’s digital fluency allow them to distinguish between fake news and real news online? WSJ’s Sue Shellenbarger has the surprising results of a study of nearly 8,000 students (from grammar school through college) that tested their ability to tell news from ads and to discern websites from hate groups and mainstream professional organizations.

Preteens and teens may appear dazzlingly fluent, flitting among social-media sites, uploading selfies and texting friends. But they’re often clueless about evaluating the accuracy and trustworthiness of what they find.

Some 82% of middle-schoolers couldn’t distinguish between an ad labeled “sponsored content” and a real news story on a website, according to a Stanford University study of 7,804 students from middle school through college. The study, set for release Tuesday, is the biggest so far on how teens evaluate information they find online. Many students judged the credibility of newsy tweets based on how much detail they contained or whether a large photo was attached, rather than on the source.”

Bryan Alexander on

On that Stanford information literacy study

https:[email protected][email protected]k30

“Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Reasoning”

Stephen

Posted on: November 25, 2016, 6:54 am Category: Uncategorized

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