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‘Just Google it’ – the scope of freely available information sources for doctoral thesis writing

‘Just Google it’ – the scope of freely available information sources for doctoral thesis writing

http://www.informationr.net/ir/22-1/paper738.html?utm_content=buffer338ea&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Vincas Grigas, Simona Juzėnienė and Jonė Veličkaitė.

 

Introduction. Recent developments in the field of scientific information resource provision lead us to the key research question, namely,what is the coverage of freely available information sources when writing doctoral theses, and whether the academic library can assume the leading role as a direct intermediator for information users.
Method.Citation analysis of doctoral theses was conducted in the summer of 2015. A total of thirty-nine theses (with 6,998 references) defended at Vilnius University at the end of 2014 was selected (30 per cent of all defended theses). Theses were randomly chosen from different research fields: the humanities, social sciences, biomedical sciences, technological sciences, and physical sciences.
Analysis.The research team was tasked with identifying whether certain resources could be found in the eCatalogue of an academic library, its subscribed databases, freely available online (through Google or Google Scholar), or whether the resources from the library`s subscribed databases are identical to those which are freely available. The data gathering process included such resource categories as journal papers, printed and electronic books or book chapters, and other documents (legal reports, conference papers, newspaper articles, Websites, theses, etc.).
Conclusions. Library collections and subscribed databases could cover up to 80 per cent of all information resources used in doctoral theses. Among the most significant findings to emerge from this study is the fact that on average more than half (57 per cent) of all utilised information resources were freely available or were accessed without library support. We may presume that the library as a direct intermediator for information users is potentially important and irreplaceable only in four out of ten attempts of PhD students to seek information.

Figure 2. Use of peer-reviewed papers (percentage)

Figure 3. Use of books and e-books (percentage)

Figure 4. Potential ways of accessing information sources (percentage) Figure 5. Percentage of freely available information sources identical to those found in subscribed databases

Figure 6. Percentage of freely available information sources and sources whose way of accessing is unknown

Grigas V., Juzėnienė & S., Veličkaitė J. (2016). ‘Just Google it’ – the scope of freely available information sources for doctoral thesis writing. Information Research, 22(1), paper 738. Retrieved from http://InformationR.net/ir/22-1/paper738.html (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6oGbvQyHa)

Stephen

Posted on: March 27, 2017, 6:33 am Category: Uncategorized

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