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The Aspen Institute Releases New Report: “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries”

The Aspen Institute Releases New Report: “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries”

“From a News Release:

“Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries” explores how public libraries can respond as the digital age increases the demand for high-speed information access, changes in our education systems, innovative job training models and additional community services to help people and communities compete in the new economy. The report is part of the Aspen Institute Dialogue on Public Libraries, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The multiyear dialogue brings library professionals, policymakers, technology experts, philanthropists, educators and civic leaders together to explore the future of public libraries.

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The “Rising to the Challenge” report recommends communities leverage three important library assets: connecting people and fostering relationships to strengthen the human capital of a community; using the both the physical and virtual spaces of libraries in new and innovative ways; and tapping into high-speed interactive platforms to curate and share ideas and knowledge.

It discusses the need for libraries to align their services more directly with the priorities of community leaders at a time when emerging technologies create a demand for digital literacy, new learning opportunities, job skills and more opportunities for people to communicate face to face. The report suggests libraries and local governments work more closely to create long-term financial sustainability, while also exploring other innovative business and revenue models.

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The report highlights a number of examples of groundbreaking work and new ways public libraries are meeting the needs of their communities. It also includes 15 action steps that the Dialogue recommends for each of its stakeholder groups: library leaders, policymakers and the community. Among these recommendations are the following five for each group:

Library Leaders

  • Define the scope of the library’s programs, services and offerings around community priorities, recognizing that this process may lead to choices and trade-offs.
  • Collaborate with government agencies at the local, state and federal levels around shared objectives. This includes partnerships with schools to drive learning and educational opportunities throughout the community.
  • Partner with local businesses, chambers of commerce and community colleges to provide access to curricula and resources, technology and certification programs, and to job search resources to maintain a highly skilled yet highly flexible workforce.
  • Engage the community in planning and decision making, and seek a seat at tables where important policy issues are discussed and decisions are made.
  • Connect resources from other agencies or libraries to the library platform rather than reinventing the wheel or always going solo.

Policymakers

  • Use the authority of office to bring together community stakeholders to create a comprehensive strategic plan for the library and other knowledge institutions in the community.
  • Define libraries as part of the community’s priority infrastructure along with other established infrastructure priorities such as schools, transportation and parks, and make sustainable long-term funding that reflects the library’s value to the community a budget priority.
  • Develop strategic alliances and partnerships with local library leaders to advance educational, economic and social goals.
  • Leverage the economic development potential of the public library as a community platform.
  • Make access to government information a model for curating open data.

Community

  • Collaborate on the development of a comprehensive strategic plan for the community’s information and knowledge ecosystem, including the library and other knowledge institutions in the community.
  • Develop strategic partnerships and alliances with public libraries around content or specific organizational or community needs.
  • Bring diverse expertise to bear on helping libraries create and share technology tools.
  • Connect knowledge resources in the community to the library’s knowledge networks.
  • Participate in the library’s platform for curating local history and culture.

Direct to Full Text Report (80 pages; PDF)

Direct to Web-Based Version the Report
It includes a collection of background readings, background papers, and case studies.”

Stephen

Posted on: October 23, 2014, 6:42 am Category: Uncategorized

The Evolution of #TV Over the Last 20 Years

The Evolution of #TV Over the Last 20 Years

http://adweek.it/1qxW8Ad via Adweek

Stephen

 

Posted on: October 23, 2014, 6:32 am Category: Uncategorized

How YouTube increased classroom pass rates by 31%

How YouTube increased classroom pass rates by 31%

http://i.imgur.com/dcDI7Jd.jpg

 

Stephen

Posted on: October 22, 2014, 7:05 am Category: Uncategorized

Competency-Based Education Framework & Readiness Assessment

Competency-Based Education Framework & Readiness Assessment

PDF: http://home.pearsonhighered.com/content/dam/ped/penak12/US/pearsonhighered/documents/CBE-Framework-Update.pdf

Competency-Based Education Framework & Readiness Assessment

 

Stephen

Posted on: October 22, 2014, 7:02 am Category: Uncategorized

5 reasons you should have a library card

5 reasons you should have a library card

Via: http://searchresearch1.blogspot.ca/2014/10/5-reasons-you-should-have-library-card.html

“One of the more powerful research tools you can have is a library card.

A library card is instant access to a world of resources. Both offline AND online.  

That might surprise you, but here are 5 reasons why you want a library card to be a great researcher.

  1. Access to online paywall content. My local library gives paywall access to Ancestry.com, Morningstar, online journals, and more.  It also provides Hoopla video (https://www.hoopladigital.com/ for downloads, and many free music downloads (lots of popular music, some of which really surprised me—this is free?  Yes!).  It also provides many different database services:  a small listing includes, Academic Onefile (journals, magazines, books, audio – great subject browser), InfoTrac (news and periodical.Updated daily.)  Can filter by type, sort by date.  General One File  and MasterFile Complete (EBSCO).  Many libraries have all this, and more.
  1. eBooks. Yes, just like physical books, many libraries support borrowing ebooks and e-magazines, typically with time restrictions on how long you can keep them, and sometimes twitchy software, but free’s free—I’ve read many books that I knew I only wanted for a short time.
  1. Local archives. Many libraries have archival content that’s never going to make it online (at least in our lifetimes). If you’re doing research on a particular location, visiting physically is often the best thing to do.  But if you can’t get there, checking out the online library can often lead to content that you won’t be able to find via search engines.  (Go figure.  For some reason, many local libraries have put great content online, but then set it up so the search engines can’t index it, making it effectively offline.  On the other hand, if you connect via the library, you can often browse that content.)
  1. Classes. I teach at libraries. So do lots of other people with great skills. Local libraries are especially good on local history, genealogy classes, general internet skill tutorials, and basic computer skills (such as the common applications).  Sometimes libraries put these classes (at least the lecture parts) up on YouTube.
  1. Reference Librarians.  They’re excellent resources of information and a source of research skills. When you go to your public library, be sure to chat with the reference librarians.  They are, in essence, professional SearchReseachers.  They know all kinds of things that are key to finding information (both online and offline) in places and in ways you might not have thought about.  (Better yet:  Many of them are available via IMs and email.  Remember the superb “Ask-A-Librarian” service is always available.  They might take a day to get back to you, but they’re very, very good.)

How to get a library card:  In North America it’s easy–just go there and fill out a simple application form.  Generally, they want you to be somewhat local, but that’s not always the case.  (I have a Los Angeles County library card because I used to live in LA County–that was good enough.)   I make it a habit to check out the libraries at different places I visit because you never know what’s possible or what they have.  Libraries are very different from each other.  When you visit, ask to see their list of online resources, and if you can get a card that will allow remote access. You’ll be surprised how often they’ll say yes.

College and University library cards.  Note that college or university library cards often come with even deeper research databases than public libraries.  Alumni can often get a library card that will allow access to their paywall access databases.  I have a couple of these (from different places where I’ve attended or taught.)  If you can get one, get it. Check out the alumni web pages at your university or college.  Again, the libraries vary tremendously.  See what your college offers.

Virtual library card:   You can get a “virtual library card” from a number of places.  The Internet Archive has one that seems to be accepted at a surprising number of places.  But a quick search for [ "virtual library card" ] will show you a number of real libraries that hand out virtual cards to anyone who applies.  With these virtual cards, you will have access to a large number of resources, including most of those listed above.

(And if you have great research experiences with your local library, write in and let us know.  I’m especially interested in the online library card experiences of people not in the US!)

Search on, with your library card! ”

 

Stephen

Posted on: October 22, 2014, 6:31 am Category: Uncategorized

NAHSL Conference – Rockport Maine

Here are my slides from this morning’s keynote at the NAHSL Conference in Rockport Maine.

Stephen

Posted on: October 21, 2014, 9:52 am Category: Uncategorized

Social Media Etiquette Guide

Social Media Etiquette Guide

http://www.tollfreeforwarding.com/blog/social-media-etiquette-guide/

 

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Stephen

Posted on: October 21, 2014, 6:55 am Category: Uncategorized