Skip to content


Tips for Students: Strategies for Reading

Tips for Students: Strategies for Reading

 

http://blog.cengage.com/tips-students-strategies-reading/

“In Essential Study Skills, Eighth Edition, author Linda Wong defines active reading as “… the process of using effective strategies to engage working memory to achieve specific reading goals” (267). To help students put the active-reading process into action, Wong includes a checklist of active reading strategies. We’ve adapted these below. Encourage your students to adopt these strategies for reading… they’ll find that they get even more out of their study time.

Suggested active-learning strategies for reading course materials

  • Before you sit down to study, grab a pen or pencil. Take down notes as you read. If you’re working with printed materials, underline essential facts and ideas and jot down notes in the margins. (Review some additional tips for effective note taking.)
  • Write the key terms, ideas, and dates from the reading onto index cards; use these as flashcards to review at a later time.
  • Create study tools as you go! For example: You could write your own practice test questions. If you see a diagram, copy it into your own notebook. Or, to take it a step further: take a idea, process, or concept that’s covered in a section of the text, and see if you can create your own chart or diagram that illustrates the information you need to learn, know, and do.
  • Carefully consider how each paragraph of the piece is structured. This active-reading strategy will help you think critically about the points and arguments presented in the reading.
  • Look closely at any photographs, illustrations, and diagrams included in the reading material. Make notes on these as well: they’re more than illustrations… they convey important information about the subject you’re studying.

Reference: Wong, Linda. 2015. Essential Study Skills, 8th ed. Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.”

Stephen

Posted on: September 30, 2014, 6:29 am Category: Uncategorized

How kids compare against their parents’ level of schooling

How kids compare against their parents’ level of schooling

How kids compare against their parents’ level of schooling

Stephen

Posted on: September 30, 2014, 6:19 am Category: Uncategorized

How to Graciously Say No to Anyone

How to Graciously Say No to Anyone

http://mashable.com/2014/09/10/how-to-say-no-to-anyone/

“Saying “no” gets easier with practice and repetition.

And having the right script—a starting point, so you’re not starting at a blank screen—can make all the difference.

Here’s a universal script that works for just about any scenario:

Hey [name],

Thanks for your note.

I’m so proud of you for ___—and I’m flattered that you’d like to bring my brain into the mix.

I need to say “no,” because ___.

But I would love to support you in a different way.

[Offer an alternative form of support here]

Thank you for being such a wonderful ___. I am honored to be part of your world.

[A few closing words of encouragement, if you’d like]

[Your name here]

For example:

Hey Angela,

Thanks for your note.

I’m so proud of you for deciding to apply for that small business owner award—and I’m flattered that you’d like to bring my brain into the mix.

I need to say “no,” because my week is already quite full—and I know it wouldn’t be sane (or humane) for me to add anything new to my plate.

But I would love to support you in a different way.

I’ve attached a couple of worksheets that I created for a recent writing workshop—including a couple of templates that will help you to craft a bio, a manifesto, and a few other pieces for your application.

Thank you for being such a wonderful friend and colleague. I am honored to be part of your world.

Good luck with the contest! I know you’re going to do a terrific job.

Alex

Here are three points to remember when you’re using this particular script—or something similar—to say “no” to a friend.

  1. Say it Fast
  2. Explain Why—Briefly
  3. Propose Something Else”

 

Stephen

Posted on: September 29, 2014, 6:27 am Category: Uncategorized

LEGAL FUTURES INFOGRAPHIC FOR THE CANADIAN BAR ASSOCIATION

LEGAL FUTURES INFOGRAPHIC FOR THE CANADIAN BAR ASSOCIATION

http://www.openlawlab.com/2014/08/18/legal-futures-infographic-canadian-bar-association/

I appreciate Margaret Hagan‘s infographic recently posted at the Open Law Lab made for the Canadian Bar Association, to illustrate the main takeaways of their new Legal Futures report.

Margaret Hagan - CBA Legal Futures infographic

Stephen

Posted on: September 29, 2014, 6:18 am Category: Uncategorized

Marketing Artists vs. Marketing Scientists

Marketing Artists vs. Marketing Scientists

 http://www.coolinfographics.com/blog/2014/9/19/marketing-artists-vs-marketing-scientists.html

Stephen

Posted on: September 29, 2014, 6:18 am Category: Uncategorized

Is a Degree Still Worth It? Yes, Researchers Say, and the Payoff Is Getting Better

Is a Degree Still Worth It? Yes, Researchers Say, and the Payoff Is Getting Better

http://chronicle.com/blogs/data/2014/09/05/is-a-degree-still-worth-it-yes-researchers-say-and-the-payoff-is-getting-better/

 

 

 

 

Stephen

Posted on: September 28, 2014, 6:51 am Category: Uncategorized

7 New Statistics About Facebook Users That Reveal Why It’s Such A Powerful Marketing Platform Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/a-primer-on-facebook-user-statistics-2014-9#ixzz3DKcsXMPi

7 New Statistics About Facebook Users That Reveal Why It’s Such A Powerful Marketing Platform

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/a-primer-on-facebook-user-statistics-2014-9#ixzz3DKcsXMPi

GWI Age Distribution

“Here are a few of the key takeaways from the BI Intelligence report:

  • Penetration and population: Facebook remains the dominant social network by a huge margin. This holds true globally and in the U.S. More than 7 out of 10 U.S. internet users ages 18 and up are accessing Facebook, according to Pew’s latest round-up of social-media adoption in the U.S.
    • Penetration reaches as high as 84% for web users between the ages of 18 and 29.
  • Gender: Gender is the most notable differentiator on Facebook. Facebook still skews significantly female. Women in the U.S. are more likely to use Facebook than men by about 10 percentage points, according to a 2013 survey of social network adoption. Considering that women’s lead on social networks in general has narrowed to 4 percentage points, it seems other social networks are doing a better job drawing in men than Facebook.
  • AgeFacebook sees users in their late 20s and early 30s account for a bigger share of users than 16- to 24-year-olds.YouTube, Tumblr, and Instagram are more dependent on younger users.
  • Teens: Facebook remains the top social network for U.S. teens. Nearly half of teen Facebook users say they’re using the site more than last year, and Facebook has more daily teen users than any other social network. That said, Instagram has edged out Facebook and Twitter in terms of prestige among young users. U.S. teens now describe Instagram as “most important,” while Facebook and Twitter lost ground on this measure, according to Piper Jaffray’s twice yearly teen survey.
  • Income: 69 % of internet users in the U.S. with an income of $75,000or above  annually are on Facebook
  • Education: 68% of internet users with a college degree are on Facebook.”

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/a-primer-on-facebook-user-statistics-2014-9#ixzz3DKd9V6ZP

Stephen

Posted on: September 28, 2014, 6:26 am Category: Uncategorized