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Digital literacy in libraries: joining the dots – Insights from Kate Lomax

Digital literacy in libraries: joining the dots – Insights from Kate Lomax

 

Posted on: July 14, 2018, 6:04 am Category: Uncategorized

The Latest Trends in Books, Ebooks, and Audiobooks

The Latest Trends in Books, Ebooks, and Audiobooks
by Nancy K. Herther
How are changing attitudes and interests impacting book publication, sales, and readership?

 

http://newsbreaks.infotoday.com/NewsBreaks/The-Latest-Trends-in-Books-Ebooks-and-Audiobooks-12

Posted on: July 13, 2018, 6:53 am Category: Uncategorized

Pew Research: “72% of the Public Thinks it Likely that Social Media Platforms Actively Censor Political Views”

Pew Research: “72% of the Public Thinks it Likely that Social Media Platforms Actively Censor Political Views”

https://www.infodocket.com/2018/06/28/pew-research-72-of-the-public-thinks-it-likely-that-social-media-platforms-actively-censor-political-views/

“From Pew Research:

In the midst of an ongoing debate over the power of digital technology companies and the way they do business, sizable shares of Americans believe these companies privilege the views of certain groups over others. Some 43% of Americans think major technology firms support the views of liberals over conservatives, while 33% believe these companies support the views of men over women, a new Pew Research Center survey finds. In addition, 72% of the public thinks it likely that social media platforms actively censor political views that those companies find objectionable.

Roughly seven-in-ten Americans think it likely that social media platforms censor political viewpoints
The belief that technology companies are politically biased and/or engaged in suppression of political speech is especially widespread among Republicans. Fully 85% of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents think it likely that social media sites intentionally censor political viewpoints, with 54% saying this is very likely. And a majority of Republicans (64%) think major technology companies as a whole support the views of liberals over conservatives.

On a personal level, 74% of Americans say major technology companies and their products and services have had more of a positive than a negative impact on their own lives. And a slightly smaller majority of Americans (63%) think the impact of these companies on society as a whole has been more good than bad. At the same time, their responses highlight an undercurrent of public unease about the technology industry and its broader role in society. When presented with several statements that might describe these firms, a 65% majority of Americans feel the statement “they often fail to anticipate how their products and services will impact society” describes them well – while just 24% think these firms “do enough to protect the personal data of their users.” Meanwhile, a minority of Americans think these companies can be trusted to do the right thing just about always (3%) or most of the time (25%), and roughly half the public (51%) thinks they should be regulated more than they are now.

Roughly half the public thinks major tech companies should be regulated more than they are now

These are among the key findings of this Pew Research Center survey, conducted May 29-June 11 among 4,594 U.S. adults.

Direct to Full Text Report

Direct to Full Text Report (17 pages; PDF)

Direct to Infographic Links

Stephen

Posted on: July 13, 2018, 6:14 am Category: Uncategorized

Canada is in the midst of an audiobooks boom

Canada is in the midst of an audiobooks boom

Posted on: July 12, 2018, 6:42 am Category: Uncategorized

ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Committee Publishes New Guidelines, Resources for Libraries on Social Media and Controversial Programs

ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Committee Publishes New Guidelines, Resources for Libraries on Social Media and Controversial Programs

“From the American Library Association:

2018-07-05_12-23-41In response to program cancellations and rising concerns about social media access and privacy, the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee published new guidelines and a Q&A for library workers.

Social Mediafor Public and Academic Libraries” provides a policy framework for public and academic libraries that use social media. Topics range from staff responsibilities and acceptable behavior, to privacy and reconsideration forms.

Using recent court cases, the resource explicates the definition of “public forum” as it relates to social media platforms, as well as outlines what may be in a library’s social media policy. The guidelines include suggestions for creating social media policies but is not intended as a comprehensive list of requirements or legal advice.

[Clip]

The IFC also published “Responding to and Preparing for Controversial Programs and Speakers Q&A,” which offers strategies and resources for libraries to address community concerns and prepare for potentially controversial library-initiated events.

The Q&A is divided into four sections: representation of all views at library programs, disinvited speakers and authors, dealing with protests and speakers, and security for programs and events. It includes suggestions on how to “set the tone” during a controversial program and how to be transparent about policies and expectations.

Source Announcement

Stephen

Posted on: July 12, 2018, 6:40 am Category: Uncategorized

Artists Information Seeking Behavior

Conference Paper: “Artists Information Seeking Behavior”

“Title

Artists’ Information Seeking Behavior

Authors

Han Leng
Curtin University

Gaby Haddow
Curtin University

Source

Library.IFLA.org

Abstract

This paper is based on a pilot study of local artists based at the Artist Open House Fremantle (AOHF), Western Australia.The study was conducted to test the interview questions that were developed for a Masters research degree, which is investigating the information seeking behaviour of higher degree by research students in art and design courses in Perth, Western Australia.

A work of art is a reflection of the artist who creates it. Artistic skills and talent form fundamental components of the unique research perspective possessed by the artists and are important considerations to be included when attempts are made to understand artists’ information seeking behaviour. Studies on artists’ information needs are relatively limited, but what distinguishes this group of information users from other professions is the nature of resources and information services required by this community.

This paper focuses how the artists meet their information needs for art and design resources; incorporating the findings from the pilot interview sessions. It also discusses the existing library and information science research literature that has explored creative artists’ information needs, and how this group of information users gather information to be utilised in the production of their creative works.

Direct to Full Text Paper
9 pages; PDF.”

Stephen

Posted on: July 12, 2018, 6:09 am Category: Uncategorized

Canadian Federation of Library Associations Applauds Government Support for Net Neutrality

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

GATINEAU, July 4, 2018 – The Canadian Federation of Library Associations/Fédération
canadienne des associations de bibliothèques (CFLA-FCAB) applauds the federal
government’s response to the “Protection of Net Neutrality in Canada” report from the
Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics.

The report, and the government’s support, emphasized the need to ensure the
continuation of net neutrality in Canada.

“Net Neutrality is a vital underpinning of the universal access to information and
knowledge that our organization strives for,” said Alix-Rae Stefanko, Chair of CFLA-FCAB.
“In our digital world, net neutrality is a crucial principle of equity.”
The government’s response highlighted its commitment to support principles of net
neutrality in telecommunications services, particularly through the Telecommunications
Act. The government has also supported motion M-168, which indicated the need to
uphold standards of net neutrality that are globally recognized.

CFLA-FCAB is also pleased to see the government is committed to ensure that
international regimes will not inhibit Canada’s position on net neutrality noting “The
Government of Canada is mindful of the concerns of Canadian enterprises and citizens
over the recent changes in the United States (US) to its net neutrality regime and will
seek to address with the US any situation whereby a Canadian enterprise is negatively
affected by the traffic management practices of a US ISP.“1

A comprehensive framework for net neutrality should be implemented that reflects the
government’s support. As governments, businesses, civil society groups and private
citizens move more data and activities to web-based platforms and more products
and services go online, action is needed to ensure the governments support translates
into legislative and regulatory reality.

“Committee members and the government understand that Net Neutrality will limit the
tendency toward monopolistic behaviour by service providers and other web-based [1
See https://www.ourcommons.ca/content/Committee/421/ETHI/GovResponse/RP9998948/
421_ETHI_Rpt14_GR/421_ETHI_Rpt14_GR-e.pdf], last accessed June 29, 2018.
companies,” added Stefanko. “We need to preserve an online ecosystem that creates
opportunity for learning, innovation, and dialogue for all Canadians as our society
becomes increasingly integrated and the internet becomes ubiquitous in our daily lives,”
she added.

The Canadian Federation of Library Associations/Fédération Canadienne des
associations de bibliothèques (CFLA-FCAB) is the national voice of Canada’s library
associations. Our purpose is to advance library excellence in Canada, champion library
values and the value of libraries and influence national and international public policy impacting libraries and their communities.

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For more information please contact:
Katherine McColgan
Executive Director
613.867.7789
[email protected]

Posted on: July 11, 2018, 12:21 pm Category: Uncategorized