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Here are the trends to watch at the world’s biggest technology show (CES)

Here are the trends to watch at the world’s biggest technology show (CES)

http://mashable.com/2018/01/04/ces-2018-tech-trends/

1. The 5G revolution begins

2. Self-driving cars refocus around the passenger

3. The smart home war that never was

4. Digital health shakes out

5. Peeking TV’s future: MicroLED, 8K

6. Augmented reality truly arrives

7. Everybody ruins wireless headphones

Stephen

Posted on: January 16, 2018, 6:30 am Category: Uncategorized

How Student Engagement is Important for Libraries

How Student Engagement is Important for Libraries

How Student Engagement is Important for Libraries

“A recent survey conducted by YouthTruth discusses whether or not students feel engaged in their school studies. Understanding student engagement is important for educators and librarians because it can give great insight into challenges affecting learning both inside and outside of the classroom. YouthTruth analyzed survey responses from over 230,000 students in grades three through twelve. The information was gathered through YouthTruth’s anonymous online climate and culture survey across 36 states. View the entire report here.”

“I have said it before and you will see me say it a lot, public libraries are the educational extension of the school classroom. It’s important that we make the connections with our community and our schools to see what areas they need help with so that we can also help bring learning and purpose to the students.”

Stephen

Posted on: January 16, 2018, 6:13 am Category: Uncategorized

Goodbye to the tech that died this year

Goodbye to the tech that died this year

Time to pay respects to the tech that met its demise in 2017.

https://www.cnet.com/news/goodbye-to-the-tech-that-died-this-year/#ftag=CAD590a51e

Stephen

Posted on: January 15, 2018, 6:26 am Category: Uncategorized

New Report/Data on Academic Libraries, Graduation Rates, Outcome Measures, Student Financial Aid, Admissions in United States (2015-2016)

“From the National Center for Education Statistics:

The percent of revenues that postsecondary institutions received from tuition and fees in 2015-16 varied greatly depending on the type of institution, according to new data released today by the National Center for Education StatisticsFor instance, public 4-year institutions and administrative offices received about 22 percent of their revenues from tuition and fees in Fiscal Year (FY) 2016, compared with just over 39 percent at private nonprofit entities and just over 90 percent at private for-profit entities.

These data were released as part of a new First Look report that includes information on Enrollment and Employees in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2016; and Financial Statistics and Academic Libraries, FY 2016.

It presents findings from the spring 2017 data collection of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), an NCES program within the Institute of Education Sciences.

Other findings include:

• In fall 2016, Title IV institutions enrolled approximately 17.3 million undergraduate and about 3 million graduate students. Of the approximately 17.3 million undergraduates, about 62 percent were enrolled in 4-year institutions and 36 percent in 2-year institutions. Nearly 2 percent were enrolled in less-than-2-year institutions;

• In FY 2016, about 29 percent of expenses at public 4-year entities were for instruction, compared with 42 percent at public 2-year entities and nearly 52 percent at public less-than-2-year entities; and

• Title IV institutions and administrative offices reported employing approximately 4.0 million individuals in fall 2016. Of those individuals, about 2.6 million were employed full-time and about 1.4 million were employed part-time.

Academic Libraries and Librarians

The report includes two charts with data about libraries and librarians.

2017-12-29_14-13-37

Source: Enrollment and Employees in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2016; and Financial Statistics and Academic Libraries, FY16; First Look (Provisional Data) via NCES

2017-12-29_13-42-34

Source: Enrollment and Employees in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2016; and Financial Statistics and Academic Libraries, FY16; First Look (Provisional Data) via NCES

Direct to Full Text Report 3 pages; PDF.

Stephen

Posted on: January 15, 2018, 6:06 am Category: Uncategorized

O’Reilly: 5 ways the web will evolve in 2018

5 ways the web will evolve in 2018

Progressive web apps, offline-first development, customer experience, and other web trends to watch.

https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/5-ways-the-web-will-evolve-in-2018

Progressive web apps shift from “on the rise” to “here to stay”

Offline matters

Customer experience leads the way

Evolving web stacks

A shifting conversation in tech and fixing our bugs

“Adam Scott’s Building Web Apps for Everyone is a great place to get started for developers and designers looking to make user-centered choices and help create a better web for everyone.”

Stephen

Posted on: January 14, 2018, 6:26 am Category: Uncategorized

The Number of American Homes With Only Wireless Telephones Continues to Grow

New Survey Findings: The Number of American Homes With Only Wireless Telephones Continues to Grow

“The latest “Wireless Substitution” reports from the National Center for Health Statistics is now available.

Formal title of the report: Wireless Substitution: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January–June 2017.

A second document/report is also available: Wireless Substitution: State-Level Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 2016.

From the Report:

Preliminary results from the January–June 2017 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) indicate that the number of American homes with only wireless telephones continues to grow.

2017-12-30_13-11-20

Source: Wireless Substitution: Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2017 (12/28/2017) via NCHS

More than one-half of American homes (52.5%) had only wireless telephones (also known as cellular telephones, cell phones, or mobile phones) during the first half of 2017—an increase of 3.2 percentage points since the first half of 2016. Nearly three-quarters of all adults aged 25-34 were living in wireless-only households; more than two-thirds (70.7%) of adults renting their homes were living in wireless-only households.

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The percentage of households that are wireless-only and the percentages of adults and children living in wireless-only households have been steadily increasing (Figure). The observed 3.2-percentagepoint increase in the percentage of households that are wireless-only from the first 6 months of 2016 through the first 6 months of 2017 was statistically significant. The 3.0-percentage-point increase for adults and the 2.9- percentage-point increase for children across the same 12-month time period were also significant. However, the increases from the second 6 months of 2016 to the first 6 months of 2017 were not statistically significant for adults (p = 0.09) or children (p = 0.24).

Approximately 3.7% of households had no telephone service (neither wireless nor landline) in the first 6 months of 2017. About 8.4 million adults (3.4%) and 2.9 million children (4.0%) lived in these households. The percentage of adults and children living without any telephone service has increased significantly over the past 3 years.

Direct to Full Text Report: Wireless Substitution: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January–June 2017
13 pages; PDF.

Direct to Wireless Substitution: State-Level Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 2016.

Direct to Previously ReleasedWireless Substitution Reports

Stephen

Posted on: January 14, 2018, 6:03 am Category: Uncategorized

Vint Cerf on “The Role of Archives in Digital Preservation”

Vint Cerf on “The Role of Archives in Digital Preservation”

http://www.infodocket.com/2017/12/31/vint-cerf-on-the-role-of-archives-in-digital-preservation/

“From a Column Published in Communications of the ACM (January 2018) by Vint Cerf:

Some readers may wonder whether the World Wide Web is already an example of an archive. It is not because there is no assurance of long-lasting storage or accessibility of the content. To be sure, the WWW content is a candidate for archiving and the Internet Archive is attempting to do exactly that.

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..archivists of digital content will need to be prescriptive about the structure and encoding of digital artifacts they can process into the archive successfully. A proactive stance could improve the likelihood that digital content can be acquired and preserve.

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a long-lived archive must rely on a business model that matches the desired longevity that might extend 100 years or more. Think of archives housing 1,000-year-old vellum codices, for example. In addition to the extensible standardization of digital representation, then, we will need legal and financial frameworks that assist long-term preservation.

Read the Complete Column (769 words)

Article Appears:
Communications of the ACM ((Vol. 61, No. 1; January 2018)”

Stephen

Posted on: January 13, 2018, 6:58 am Category: Uncategorized