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Here are the big 5 publishers terms for libraries in 2021

Here are the big 5 publishers terms for libraries in 2021

Here are the big 5 publishers terms for libraries in 2021

 

 

 

Posted on: February 24, 2021, 2:31 pm Category: Uncategorized

Join the Movement: Canadian libraries increasingly scrapping late fees to boost access to services

CBC: Canadian libraries increasingly scrapping late fees to boost access to services

Posted on: February 24, 2021, 11:06 am Category: Uncategorized

The Panorama Project: “Immersive Media & Books 2020: Consumer Behavior and Experience with Multiple Media Forms

New Research Report From The Panorama Project: “Immersive Media & Books 2020: Consumer Behavior and Experience with Multiple Media Forms”

https://www.infodocket.com/2021/02/17/panorama-project-releases-immersive-media-books-2020-research-report/

“From a Panorama Project Post:

The Panorama Project, a cross-industry publishing initiative, released today Immersive Media & Books 2020 a comprehensive market study that gauges the role of books and consumer engagement by age groups, ethnicity, and more.  This report contains survey data from 4,300+ pre-qualified respondents and was authored by Dr. Rachel Noorda and Dr. Kathi Inman-Berens, faculty members of the Portland State University graduate program in Book Publishing.

Data collection and analysis for Immersive Media & Books 2020 were conducted in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic and represent Panorama Project’s ongoing commitment to research.  The report is rich with data, including graphs and tables to illustrate provocative findings that will stimulate discourse between publishers, authors, librarians, booksellers, thought leaders, advocacy groups and the media.

A few select findings include:

  • Avid book engagers (4+ books/month) are more ethnically diverse and younger than the general survey population.
  • Demographics for the industry to watch are Black and Latinx, millennials and men.
  • Readers of audiobooks and ebooks are multitasking (70% for audiobooks, 61% for eBooks).
  • Book “pirates” are also customers: 41% of book pirates not only buy books, they also buy the same book in multiple formats.
  • Libraries, bookstores, and online channels mutually reinforce each other, leading to engagement and sales.

[Clip]

With financial support from OverDrive, the Book Industry Study Group, the American Library Association and the Independent Book Publishers Association, the Panorama Project commissioned Portland State University’s Dr. Rachel Noorda and Dr. Kathi Inman-Berens to design and conduct the study and author the resulting report.

 Methodology for the survey and the research questions were developed with guidance from industry leaders who serve on Panorama Project’s Research Committee.  Qualtrics hosted the survey and recruited over 4300 respondents.  Drs. Noorda and Inman-Berens ensured equitable representation of demographic groups by region (USA only), race/ethnicity, gender, and age.  The project was approved by Portland State University’s Institutional Review Board on Human Ethics.

Direct to Complete Announcement, Info About Upcoming Webinar

Posted on: February 24, 2021, 6:51 am Category: Uncategorized

Three Things that are Abundant and Three Things that are Scarce

Wisdom from New World Same Humans

🎧 If you’d prefer to listen to this week’s instalment, go here for the audio version of New World Same Humans #51🎧

“Three Things that are Abundant

We all sense that we’re living at a moment of system-wide transition. But what is the nature of this shift? An examination of three newly-abundant goods can help us to get a handle on that question.

🌐 Information
The most obvious of the three. Still, it’s hard for people who grew up with the internet to understand how scare information was in an unconnected world. You could argue with a friend for days about a simple matter of fact – the title of some band’s second album, or the correct spelling of Reykjavík – because there was no way to discover the answer. These days I walk most afternoons, and think. I take it for granted that all the world’s information is a touch away. If my phone dies and some chain of thought comes to halt at a fact-impasse, I feel as if a part of my brain has been amputated. The devices that allow us access to the infosphere have essentially, then, merged with our brains. The nature of thought itself has changed. Note: abundant information doesn’t mean abundant knowledge – more on this below.

🦾 Capital
In World After Capital, Albert Wenger argues that we’re living at a moment of transition out of the industrial age, which was an age defined by capital scarcity. Today, physical capital – food, cars, factories, machines – is no longer the defining constraint on human endeavour. China can build a megacity in a handful of years, or a new hospital in days. Yes, access to capital is still highly unequal, and that’s a problem. But across the aggregate we have enough to serve the material needs of all humanity. That’s an epoch-defining shift. So where next? We’ve moved, says Wenger, into the knowledge age, in which the defining constraint is human attention.

🧠 Intelligence
This one is emergent. Across history, we humans have been the only source of the kinds of intelligence able to solve our problems. In the world to come, that intelligence is abundant. We glimpse this new reality when an AI interprets an MRI scan and diagnoses cancer. Or drives a car on the open road. Or solves one of biology’s most famous problems. Remember, this shift doesn’t mean an abundance of virtual objects that are equivalent to human minds. The AIs we’re building are narrow. They can operate only within a limited domain; but often are superhuman inside it.  And they’re not, as far as we understand, aware; though this quickly becomes complex. Still, democratised access to superhuman, narrow AI is a revolution that will reshape the economy, and do something weirder. That is, slowly erode the feeling we’ve always taken for granted, as a species, of being the smartest entity in the room.


Three Things that are Scarce

So what lies ahead? Previous historical ages – agrarian, industrial – were defined by the primary constraint on human activity: land and capital respectively. So to understand the nature of life inside the knowledge age, it pays to look at what will be scarce.

🧑‍💻 Knowledge
Yes, information is abundant. But knowledge – that is, information synthesised so as to become useful to us – is still scarce. There’s so much we need to know. How the human brain works. How to generate an endless, cheap supply of clean energy. How to stop the ageing process. It’s common to observe that a connected world has not amplified us in the ways dreamed about by the early internet pioneers. One explanation? The internet was an information Big Bang, but we’ve had no symmetrical explosion in our ability to process that information. The tools we use to interface with this new info-universe – primarily some version of a news feed – are limited and rely on an outdated Gutenberg conceptualisation of knowledge. We need new kinds of knowledge tools. This is a problem I’ve become increasingly interested in recently. More coming soon!

👁️ Attention
It’s attention, argues Wenger, that’s the defining constraint of the new knowledge age. If we are to solve the huge problems we face in the 21st-century, we need to direct vast amounts of attention towards them. Capitalism was great at allocation of capital: that’s how we got so rich. But it’s terrible at allocation of attention, and incentivises many of the world’s smartest people to spend their days devising new credit derivatives rather than solving climate change. The sharp end of attention scarcity, it seems to me, is our need for creativity. We’ll continue to face complex social and ethical problems that can only be solved via uniquely human understanding and intuition. Wenger says the beginnings of a new system to allocate attention lie in (i) mindfulness that allows us as individuals to regulate our attention, and (ii) decentralised systems that aim to spread knowledge widely, rather than create new concentrations of capital.

🤝 Connection
By this I mean human connection of the I see you variety. If we achieve a world of total abundance – a world in which we have enough of everything – connection will be the only scarcity left. It can be understood, then, as a kind of Ultimate Scarcity; one which we cannot transcend. To truly be with, and listen to, another person is the ultimate non-scalable good. It means physical presence. It means deeply focused one-on-one attention. And it can’t be outsourced to machines. Yes, there will eventually be convincing AI conversational agents; we may even come to accept that AIs are aware and can themselves, in some sense, see us. But people will continue to want to be seen by other people. This is simply a way of saying: in a world in which we have everything we could ever need, what will remain is our quest to truly know one another. That is the reward at the end of Total Abundance. A chance to dedicate ourselves to the work that only we can do.”

Posted on: February 24, 2021, 6:16 am Category: Uncategorized

Research Article: “Development of a Web Tool to Increase Research Literacy in Underserved Populations Through Public Library Partnerships”

Research Article: “Development of a Web Tool to Increase Research Literacy in Underserved Populations Through Public Library Partnerships”

“The article linked to below was recently published by PLOS One.

Title

Development of a Web Tool to Increase Research Literacy in Underserved Populations Through Public Library Partnerships

Authors

Catherine A. O’Brian
Northwestern University

Laura Tom
Q. Eileen Wafford
Shenita Mack
Samuel R. Mendez
Magdalena Nava
Rabih Dahdouh
Rachelle Paul-Brutus
Kathryn H. Carpenter
Barbara Kern
Kristi L. Holmes

Source

PLoS ONE 16(2): e0246098
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0246098

Abstract

Objective

Inadequate diversity in clinical trials is widely recognized as a significant contributing factor to health disparities experienced by racial/ethnic minorities and other diverse populations in the US. To address this in a scalable way, we sought to develop a web tool that could help enhance underserved minority participation in clinical research.

Methods

We used our research literacy support flashcard tool as the initial prototype for human-centered design and usability testing of the web tool Health for All in public library settings. After forming partnerships with leadership from Chicago Public Libraries (CPL), local medical libraries, and the Chicago Department of Public Health, we conducted seven iterative design sessions with focus groups of library patrons and library staff from six CPL branches serving underserved communities followed by two rounds of usability testing and website modification.

Results

Based on the qualitative research findings from Design Sessions 1–7, we enacted the design decision of a website that was a hybrid of fact-filled and vignette (personal stories) paper prototypes divided into 4 modules (trust, diversity, healthy volunteers, pros/cons), each with their own outcome metrics. The website was thus constructed, and navigation issues identified in two rounds of usability testing by library patrons were addressed through further website modification, followed by the launch of a beta version of a hybridized single-scrolling and guided module prototype to allow further development with website analytics.

Conclusions

We report the development of Health for All, a website designed to enhance racial/ethnic minority participation in clinical trials by imparting research literacy, mitigating distrust engendered by longstanding racism and discrimination, and providing connections to clinical trials recruiting participants.

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Posted on: February 24, 2021, 6:04 am Category: Uncategorized

A Beginner’s Guide to Getting Your Book Published

A Beginner’s Guide to Getting Your Book Published

Posted on: February 23, 2021, 6:52 am Category: Uncategorized

Blog Series: What can you do as a Library Board to improve the relationship between your municipal council and the public library? (Post #2 of 5)

Blog Series: What can you do as a Library Board to improve the relationship between your municipal council and the public library? (Post #2 of 5)

Blog Series: What can you do as a Library Board to improve the relationship between your municipal council and the public library? (Post #2 of 5)

 

Posted on: February 23, 2021, 6:25 am Category: Uncategorized