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Privacy Literacy Instruction Practices in Academic Libraries: Past, Present, and Possibilities

Journal Article: “Privacy Literacy Instruction Practices in Academic Libraries: Past, Present, and Possibilities”

https://www.infodocket.com/2021/02/08/journal-article-privacy-literacy-instruction-practices-in-academic-libraries-past-present-and-possibilities/

“The article linked below was published in the December 2020 issue of IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations) Journal.

Title

Privacy Literacy Instruction Practices in Academic Libraries: Past, Present, and Possibilities
Article begins on page 3 of the PDF/page 305 of the publication.

Authors

Sarah Hartman-Caverly
Penn State Berks

Alexandria Chisholm
Penn State Berks

Source

IFLA Journal
Vol 64, No 4 (December 2020)
(Open Access via IFLA)

Abstract

This article explores the past, present, and possibilities of privacy and privacy literacy (PL) instruction in academic libraries. It surveys the scholarship on privacy and privacy literacy from the domains of philosophy, anthropology, history, law, education, and LIS. A privacy conceptual model is proposed demonstrating the zones of informational agency that privacy preserves, and a timeline of privacy and libraries documents key developments in privacy culture in the US. Findings from an original exploratory survey of privacy literacy instruction practices in academic libraries are discussed. The survey identifies the rationales, topics, contexts, methods, and assessments academic librarians use in delivering privacy literacy instruction, as well as barriers against privacy literacy that they encounter.

Source: IFLA Journal (Vol 64, No 4)

The article concludes with a case study explicating the authors’ own privacy literacy instruction experiences, and specific recommendations for overcoming the barriers to delivering privacy literacy instruction in academic libraries identified in the survey findings.

Direct to Full Text Article
Article begins on page 3 of the PDF/page 305 of the publication.”

Posted on: March 3, 2021, 6:48 am Category: Uncategorized

New “COVIDiot” study explores the impact of using an aggressive style to convey public health messages

New “COVIDiot” study explores the impact of using an aggressive style to convey public health messages

Psychologically distance may play an important role in the acceptance of scientific recommendations

New “COVIDiot” study explores the impact of using an aggressive style to convey public health messages

 

 

Posted on: March 3, 2021, 6:41 am Category: Uncategorized

Use This Visual Search Engine to Find Images With Similar Energy

Use This Visual Search Engine to Find Images With Similar Energy

Posted on: March 3, 2021, 6:09 am Category: Uncategorized

“A Disciplinary View of Changes in Publications’ Reference Lists After Peer Review”

Research Paper (Preprint): “A Disciplinary View of Changes in Publications’ Reference Lists After Peer Review”

“The research article (preprint) linked below was recently posted on arXiv.

Title

A Disciplinary View of Changes in Publications’ Reference Lists After Peer Review

Authors

Aliakbar Akbaritabar
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research

Dimity Stephen
German Centre for Higher Education Research and Science Studies

Source

via arXiv

DOI

Abstract

This paper provides insight into the changes manuscripts undergo during peer review, the potential reasons for these changes, and the differences between scientific fields. A growing body of literature is assessing the effect of peer review on manuscripts, however much of this research currently focuses on the social and medical sciences. We matched more than 6,000 preprint-publication pairs across multiple fields and quantified the changes in their reference lists.

We also quantified the change in references per full-text section for 565 pairs from PLOS journals. In addition, we conducted manual checks of a randomly chosen sample of 98 pairs to validate our results, and undertook a qualitative analysis based on the context of the reference to investigate the potential reasons for reference changes.

We found 10 disciplines, mostly in the natural sciences with high levels of removed references. Methods sections undergo the most relative change in the natural sciences, while in the medical and health sciences, the results and discussion sections underwent the most changes. Our qualitative analysis identified issues with our results due to incomplete preprint reference lists.

In addition, we deduced 10 themes for changing references during peer review. This analysis suggested that manuscripts in the natural and medical sciences undergo more extensive reframing of the literature used to situate and interpret the results of studies than the social and agricultural sciences, which are further embedded in the existing literature through peer review. Peer review in engineering tends to focus on methodological details. Our results are useful to the body of literature examining the effectiveness of peer review in fulfilling its intended purposes.

arXiv:2102.03110 [cs.DL]

Direct to Full Text Article
26 pages; PDF.”

Posted on: March 2, 2021, 6:46 am Category: Uncategorized

Vancouver Public Library’s new Indigenous storyteller in residence goes virtual

Vancouver Public Library’s new Indigenous storyteller in residence goes virtual

‘I’m hoping, fingers are crossed, that I’ll still be able to make those connections,’ Kung Jaadee says

Posted on: March 2, 2021, 6:42 am Category: Uncategorized

The Most Likely Timeline for Life to Return to Normal

The Most Likely Timeline for Life to Return to Normal

USA

https://www.route-fifty.com/health-human-services/2021/02/most-likely-timeline-life-return-normal/172224/

 

 

 

Posted on: March 2, 2021, 6:40 am Category: Uncategorized

Ontario Public Libraries: The Estimates Process

The Estimates Process

by Peggy Malcolm

https://www.sols.org/blog/2021/02/26/the-estimates-process-2/
Snippet:

“I have been thinking about the use of the word ‘budget’ in the public library world. That is, not the use of the word budget as it refers to the document used to track expected revenues and expenses each year, but the use of the word budget in relation to the financial support of the library by its appointing Council.

Each year, representatives from the local public library, perhaps the board chair and the library CEO, must go to their local council to ask for funding support for the next year.  To prepare for this request, the library board prepares a financial plan for the coming year, often prepared in the format of a budget. Section24 of the Public Libraries Act is the provincial legislation that describes the process by which a library can ask for this funding request.  Note that this section of the legislation is called ‘estimates’ and not ‘budgets’”

Posted on: March 2, 2021, 6:13 am Category: Uncategorized