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Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communications Releases “Antiracism Toolkit for Organizations”

Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communications Releases “Antiracism Toolkit for Organizations”

“From the Antiracism Toolkit for Organizations Website:

This guide is the second in a series of antiracism toolkits for scholarly publishing. The first, the Antiracism Toolkit for Allies, was published in August 2020 and includes an introduction that provides the foundation for this project. The third, the Antiracism Toolkit for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color, is forthcoming as of the publication of this guide.

Direct to Complete Toolkit

More Toolkits: Direct to Toolkits For Equity Website

Posted on: September 24, 2021, 6:48 am Category: Uncategorized

5 Tips for Online Interviews with Library Employers

5 Tips for Online Interviews with Library Employers

5 Tips for Online Interviews with Library Employers

 

Posted on: September 24, 2021, 6:32 am Category: Uncategorized

Inside HigherED: 3 Principles to Guide Non-Profit/For-Profit Partnerships

How to think about when and when not to partner.

Principle #1: Partner when the function is tangential to the core mission.

Principle #2: Partner when the necessary expertise is too specialized to create in-house.

Principle #3: Partner when it is impossible to go up an institutional learning curve alone.

 

Posted on: September 24, 2021, 6:23 am Category: Uncategorized

September 30 is National Day for Truth and Reconciliation (Orange Shirt Day)

A National Residential School Crisis Line has been set up to provide support for survivors. This 24-Hour Crisis Line can be accessed at: 1-866-925-4419. The Indian Residential School Survivors Society (IRSSS) can be contacted toll-free at 1-800-721-0066 or on their website at https://www.irsss.ca/

September 30 is National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

On September 30, now National Day for Truth and Reconciliation (Orange Shirt Day), wear an orange shirt to honour and remember the experiences and loss of the thousands of children who were stolen from their families and placed in residential schools.

Read Phyllis’ Story: the original orange shirt

As you plan for National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, consider the following recommendations from the OLA Indigenous Advisory Council:

  • Take the time to ensure that any purchases you make are supporting Indigenous communities. The Indigenous Advisory Council recommends supporting the following organizations.
    • Orange Shirts:
  • Donate:
  • Books:



  • Advocate and support residential school Survivors:
    • Provide space and resources to support survivors in accessing and completing settlement paperwork;
    • Share information with your community on how they can help hold the federal government accountable for the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action, in particular:





Libraries and schools have a role in reconciliation, information sharing, and learning. Learn how libraries and educational institutions can implement the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action, particularly as they relate to education, language, and culture: read the CFLA Committee on Indigenous Matters’ Truth and Reconciliation Report.

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Posted on: September 24, 2021, 6:07 am Category: Uncategorized

Promoting Your Library On All Channels: What Are Your Most Pressing Concerns or Questions About Library Marketing?

Promoting Your Library On All Channels: What Are Your Most Pressing Concerns or Questions About Library Marketing?

Promoting Your Library On All Channels: What Are Your Most Pressing Concerns or Questions About Library Marketing?

 

Posted on: September 23, 2021, 6:45 am Category: Uncategorized

Freedom on the Net 2021: The Global Drive to Control Big Tech

Freedom on the Net 2021

The Global Drive to Control Big Tech

“In the high-stakes battle between states and technology companies, the rights of internet users have become the main casualties.

WRITTEN BY
Adrian Shahbaz
Allie Funk

Key Findings

Global internet freedom declined for the 11th consecutive year. The greatest deteriorations were documented in Myanmar, Belarus, and Uganda, where state forces cracked down amid electoral and constitutional crises. Myanmar’s 14-point score decline is the largest registered since the Freedom on the Net project began.

Governments clashed with technology companies on users’ rights. Authorities in at least 48 countries pursued new rules for tech companies on content, data, and competition over the past year. With a few positive exceptions, the push to regulate the tech industry, which stems in some cases from genuine problems like online harassment and manipulative market practices, is being exploited to subdue free expression and gain greater access to private data.

Free expression online is under unprecedented strain. More governments arrested users for nonviolent political, social, or religious speech than ever before. Officials suspended internet access in at least 20 countries, and 21 states blocked access to social media platforms. Authorities in at least 45 countries are suspected of obtaining sophisticated spyware or data-extraction technology from private vendors.

China ranks as the worst environment for internet freedom for the seventh year in a row. Chinese authorities imposed draconian prison terms for online dissent, independent reporting, and mundane daily communications. The COVID-19 pandemic remains one of the most heavily censored topics. Officials also cracked down on the country’s tech giants, citing their abuses related to competition and data protection, though the campaign further concentrated power in the hands of the authoritarian state.

The United States’ score declined for the fifth consecutive year. False, misleading, and manipulated information continued to proliferate online, even affecting public acceptance of the 2020 presidential election results. The new administration took promising steps to enforce stronger protections for internet users.

State intervention must protect human rights online and preserve an open internet. The emancipatory power of the internet depends on its egalitarian nature. To counter digital authoritarianism, democracies should ensure that regulations enable users to express themselves freely, share information across borders, and hold the powerful to account.”

Posted on: September 23, 2021, 6:42 am Category: Uncategorized

Resources to Help Students Recognize Logical Fallacies and Cognitive Biases

Resources to Help Students Recognize Logical Fallacies and Cognitive Biases

https://www.freetech4teachers.com/2021/08/resources-to-help-students-recognize.html

“I frequently recommend Your Logical Fallacy Is. It is a website that provides short explanations and examples of twenty-four common logical fallacies. Visitors to the site can click through the gallery to read the examples. Your Logical Fallacy Is also provides free PDF poster files that you can download and print.

The same people that produced Your Logical Fallacy Is also hosts a website called Your Bias IsYour Bias Is provides an interactive guide to understanding 24 cognitive biases and how those biases affect how we interpret information that we find. Your Bias Is also offers free PDF poster files that you can download and print.”

The Guide to Common Fallacies is a series of videos produced by the PBS Ideas channel. Each video covers a different common fallacy. Included in the series are lessons about Strawman, Ad Hominem, Black and White, Authority fallacies.”

Wireless Philosophy offers 35 videos that explain various logical fallacies and how they are employed by authors and public speakers.

Why People Fall for Misinformation is a good TED-Ed lesson about critical thinking. The video does a nice job of helping viewers understand the role of simplistic, narratives in spreading misinformation. The video also provides a good explanation of the differences between misinformation and disinformation.”

 

Posted on: September 23, 2021, 6:25 am Category: Uncategorized