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Arguing on the internet: UW researchers studying how to make online arguments productive

Arguing on the internet: UW researchers studying how to make online arguments productive

https://www.washington.edu/news/2021/04/19/uw-researchers-studying-how-to-make-online-arguments-productive/

“The internet seems like the place to go to get into fights. Whether they’re with a family member or a complete stranger, these arguments have the potential to destroy important relationships and consume a lot of emotional energy.

Researchers at the University of Washington worked with almost 260 people to understand these disagreements and to develop potential design interventions that could make these discussions more productive and centered around relationship-building. The team published these findings this April in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the ACM in Human Computer Interaction Computer-Supported Cooperative Work.

“Despite the fact that online spaces are often described as toxic and polarizing, what stood out to me is that people, surprisingly, want to have difficult conversations online,” said lead author Amanda Baughan, a UW doctoral student in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. “It was really interesting to see that people are not having the conversations they want to have on online platforms. It pointed to a big opportunity to design to support more constructive online conflict.””

And for fun:

 

 

Posted on: May 18, 2021, 6:41 am Category: Uncategorized

Microsoft is Shutting Down Microsoft Academic Search and Related Services

Microsoft is Shutting Down Microsoft Academic Search and Related Services

“Update May 8, 2021 Our Research (Providers of Unsub and Unpaywall) Report They’re Building a Microsoft Academic Graph Replacement (via OurResearch)

More: A New nterview with Our Research Co-Founder, Jason Priem (via Research Information)

We’re very excited to learn more about what Heather, Jason, and team are developing!!!

—End Update—

A brief note from infoDOCKET Founder/Editor, Gary Price:

I’m VERY sad to learn Microsoft is planning plan to shutdown the wonderful and powerful Microsoft Academic Search (that utilizes the also wonderful Microsoft Academic Graph) at the end of 2021. IMHO in some cases it provides/provided better results than Google Scholar along with a number of features GS doesn’t provide at all. The bottom line is that having a variety of tools to select from is always a good thing.

Since it relaunched in early 2016 this free search resource has proven amazingly useful, not only valuable as a stand-alone search tool but also as a corpus of material searchable via other tools including Lens.org*.

From the MSFT Academic Blog Post:

Q: Why is Microsoft retiring MAS? 

A: MAS was conceived seven years ago in response to feedback from our colleagues in academia where the inequality in accessing large datasets presented a significant obstacle to conducting research and cultivating talents in the areas of Big Data and AI. With MAS, we have been proud to contribute to a culture of open exchange and a growing ecosystem of collaborators. As MAS has achieved its objective to remove the data access barriers for our research colleagues, it is the right time to explore other opportunities to give back to communities outside of academia.

Read the Complete Blog Post

More Users?

While we might never know the exact reasons why Microsoft decided to end Academic I wonder if a larger user base would have made a difference to the company? My experience has been that those who used MSFT Academic find/found a powerful resource but many who might have found it to be worthy of their attention/use were either unaware and/or had never actually tried searching with it.

Life Goes On, Some Good News

While the loss of MS Academic Search is sad news there are a number of other EXCELLENT, open web (free), academic research search tools that are worthy of your attention and use. Some include bibliographic information/direct links to open access articles as well as bibliographic info about paywalled materials. Others, provide material only about open access content.

Some of Infodocket’s Academic Search Favorites Include:

Along with it’s superb searching/retrieval capabilities I’m a very regular user of the alerting services Semantic Scholar offers (free).

** The scholarly research corpus used by Lens includes/included bibliographic data from a number of providers.”

Posted on: May 18, 2021, 6:38 am Category: Uncategorized

The Best Conferences in 2021 for Anyone Looking To Learn More About Library Promotions and Marketing

The Best Conferences in 2021 for Anyone Looking To Learn More About Library Promotions and Marketing

The Best Conferences in 2021 for Anyone Looking To Learn More About Library Promotions and Marketing

 

Posted on: May 18, 2021, 6:36 am Category: Uncategorized

Reasoning is social: The Argumentative Theory of Human Reason

Reasoning is Social

The Argumentative Theory of Human Reason

Reasoning is social

 

 

Posted on: May 18, 2021, 6:27 am Category: Uncategorized

New Ex Libris Commissioned Report: “Managing, Accessing, and Using Course Materials: Understanding the Challenges of Faculty and Students”

New Ex Libris Commissioned Report: “Managing, Accessing, and Using Course Materials: Understanding the Challenges of Faculty and Students”

“From Ex Libris:

The study was commissioned by Ex Libris and conducted by Alterline, an independent research agency.

The report presents findings from a survey of 103 faculty members and 257 students in the United States, in a range of disciplines.

Key findings of the study include the following:

  • Faculty members are bearing the administrative burden of managing course resources. Only 15% of faculty members reported that they receive help from a teaching assistant, instructional designer, or someone else in managing tasks related to course materials.
  • Academic libraries are underused by the faculty in the search for new course materials. Faculty members use web-search results, recommendations from peers, and other sources more frequently than the library to find new course materials.
  • Faculty members are using a diverse range of resources. Links to online resources and PDF files of books, book chapters, and articles are regularly used by faculty for their courses. However, resource lists still contain numerous references to physical books and textbooks, perhaps suggesting a lack of alternative online texts.
  • Measures of student engagement with course materials are lacking. Faculty members continue to use mostly traditional methods of monitoring student engagement, such as quizzes, tests, and the level of class participation, and tend to pay little attention to statistics on students’ use of course materials.
  • The move to online learning has created new pressure on the faculty to assist students in accessing course materials online. Key difficulties involve finding digital versions of physical resources, managing broken hyperlinks, and obtaining resources that are behind paywalls.
  • Faculty members are making an effort to reduce the cost of course materials. The report shows that 64% of faculty members have revised their choice of course resources because of cost. A substantial minority of faculty members (34%) went one step further, selecting only those course materials that are free for students.
  • Libraries have an opportunity to increase their involvement in teaching and learning by applying their expertise. Faculty members are primarily interested in obtaining the library’s support for the purchase, licensing, and digitization of course materials; the reduction of costs for students; and copyright clearance when necessary.

Direct to Full Text Report: Read the report for free: Managing, Accessing, and Using Course Materials.

“Jerusalem, Israel—May 12, 2021. Ex Libris, a ProQuest company, is pleased to announce the publication of a study that looks at how course resources are being selected, managed, accessed, and used today in higher education in the United States. The trends highlighted in the report reflect the new emphasis on remote teaching and learning.

The study was commissioned by Ex Libris and conducted by Alterline, an independent research agency. The report presents findings from a survey of 103 faculty members and 257 students in the United States, in a range of disciplines.

Key findings of the study include the following:

  • Faculty members are bearing the administrative burden of managing course resources. Only 15% of faculty members reported that they receive help from a teaching assistant, instructional designer, or someone else in managing tasks related to course materials.
  • Academic libraries are underused by the faculty in the search for new course materials. Faculty members use web-search results, recommendations from peers, and other sources more frequently than the library to find new course materials.
  • Faculty members are using a diverse range of resources. Links to online resources and PDF files of books, book chapters, and articles are regularly used by faculty for their courses. However, resource lists still contain numerous references to physical books and textbooks, perhaps suggesting a lack of alternative online texts.
  • Measures of student engagement with course materials are lacking. Faculty members continue to use mostly traditional methods of monitoring student engagement, such as quizzes, tests, and the level of class participation, and tend to pay little attention to statistics on students’ use of course materials.
  • The move to online learning has created new pressure on the faculty to assist students in accessing course materials online. Key difficulties involve finding digital versions of physical resources, managing broken hyperlinks, and obtaining resources that are behind paywalls.
  • Faculty members are making an effort to reduce the cost of course materials. The report shows that 64% of faculty members have revised their choice of course resources because of cost. A substantial minority of faculty members (34%) went one step further, selecting only those course materials that are free for students.
  • Libraries have an opportunity to increase their involvement in teaching and learning by applying their expertise. Faculty members are primarily interested in obtaining the library’s support for the purchase, licensing, and digitization of course materials; the reduction of costs for students; and copyright clearance when necessary.

Ex Libris vice president of Teaching and Learning Solutions Tamar Sadeh commented, “Despite the challenging circumstances brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the transition to online learning has presented an opportunity for the faculty to be creative in delivering materials and meeting student needs. Faculty members have done a tremendous job to ensure that learning continues at a high standard. Nevertheless, much more can be done to support the faculty and students, including simplifying the management of, and access to, course resources and strengthening the collaboration of faculty members and librarians to reduce the cost of materials.”

Alterline Research Manager Zara Lawson said, “Our research highlights that quite a few areas of teaching and learning are impacted by the pandemic. While much of the administrative burden of managing course materials lays on faculty members, they have shown high levels of dedication to mitigate the effects of Covid-19 on student success. There are clear opportunities for bolstering intra-institutional support and raising the profile of services and expertise that faculty can rely on.”

Read the report for free: Managing, Accessing, and Using Course Materials.

About Alterline

Alterline is an insight and intelligence agency specializing in higher education. Over the past nine years we have worked on over 70 university campuses to drive positive change based on developing an independent and evidenced understanding of the student experience. Our tailored and collaborative insight services cover decision-making and experience across undergraduate and postgraduate student life cycles, including recruitment, teaching and learning, library user experience, and alumni engagement. Building communities of best practice around insight and intelligence tools, our work offers university teams opportunities for shared learning and collaboration which underpin service performance improvement and drive exciting innovations.

About Ex Libris

Ex Libris, a ProQuest company, is a leading global provider of cloud-based SaaS solutions that enable institutions and their individual users to create, manage, and share knowledge. In close collaboration with its customers and the broader community, Ex Libris develops creative solutions that increase library productivity, maximize the impact of research activities, enhance teaching and learning, and drive student mobile engagement. Ex Libris serves over 7,500 customers in 90 countries. For more information, see our website and join us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter.”

Posted on: May 18, 2021, 6:21 am Category: Uncategorized

A guide to a copyright infringement scam that is currently spreading. 

A guide to a copyright infringement scam that is currently spreading.

Here is the link – https://comparite.ch/copyright-scam

Don’t click the link! Scam threatens website with copyright legal action

Posted on: May 18, 2021, 6:04 am Category: Uncategorized

Five Mistakes to Make When Designing Your Book Cover

Five Mistakes to Make When Designing Your Book Cover

Five Mistakes to Make When Designing Your Book Cover

 

 

Posted on: May 17, 2021, 6:03 pm Category: Uncategorized