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Google Algorithm Changes

Google tweaks its algorithm all the time – maybe even every day or more.

However, this is a big change and I find it interesting.

Official: Google Now Lets One Domain Dominate Search Results
Aug 20, 2010 by Barry Schwartz

“Prior to this week, Google would only show up to two results from the same domain on a single search result page. Now, Google has confirmed what many are seeing, where a single brand dominates a single page of Google’s search results.

This is not a bug, this is not an anomaly, it is an intentional change to Google’s ranking algorithm.”

Read Search Engine Land for more above.

This reduces diversity of links on the first three pages of search results and few people ever venture past the first page above the fold.

It allows for seach engne optimizers to ensure that their clients dominate the first page of results.

It means that dominant players in an industry can dominate the hits on your searches (and ensure that the ads are their’s too).

It might not be a big thing but it might be. Professional searchers need to be aware of ths change and those of us who teach search and find skills might want to add this soundbite to our training sessions.

Can you imagine a library database subscription where the algorithm would actually prefer the sites that paid for placement? There would howls of outcry. Is that possible or probable here?

Stephen

Posted on: August 20, 2010, 5:22 pm Category: Uncategorized

3 Responses

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  1. While it might be abit early to know of the full on-screen effect on a regular basis, would be interesting to explore what we would advise to users during search training sessions –meaning type of searches to diversify yet still capture relevant search results to reduce single brand dominance.

  2. While it might be abit early to know of the full on-screen effect on a regular basis, would be useful to explore what we would advise to users during search training sessions: type of searches to diversify, yet still capture relevant search results to reduce single brand dominance. And motivators for searchers to take those extra steps.

  3. You forgot to add Google’s comment, “For queries that indicate a strong user interest in a particular domain.”

    Google is tracking which results are clicked-through, and it appears that the domains that have the most action for a given keyword (or set of keywords) are being permitted a greater number or results from the same domain. I would expect Google to monitor click-through sources to discredit automated click-though generators.

    This isn’t an issue of paid placement, but one of allowing user activity to impact results. It will certainly make it harder for a new domain to get above the fold for common keywords.

    That said, I do believe that back links are still the most significant factor in Google’s algorithm. If you can get in the results at all for a given keyword or key phrase, back links will still float you to the top.