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Reference Desk Recycling

I’ve never been a big fan of ‘reference’ desks but this one is cool. It shows more of that Dutch library innovation.

This desk is made of recycled books in Deflt.

See more views of it here.

Stephen

Posted on: September 13, 2010, 11:29 am Category: Uncategorized

14 Responses

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  1. great idea!!!!

  2. I had a coffee table like this. it is very hard to level ๐Ÿ˜‰

  3. That’s great. Now I know what I do with my brockhaus ๐Ÿ™‚

  4. Sylvie – the easiest levelling is in ripping apart the top level of books. Something that librarians can’t do without nightmares of Ranganathan chasing them trough the stacks trying to break their spine.
    [grin]
    Stephen

  5. Do they realize that there are people in the world who don’t have enough money to own a book, not one? I think this is a terrible waste of something so vital to education and learning language. Meanwhile I have posted a link to a site where people collect books for children.

  6. Do they realize that there are people in the world who don’t have enough money to own a book, not one? I think this is a terrible waste of something so vital to education and learning language. Meanwhile I have posted a link to a site where people collect books for children. http://www.boatersforbooks.org/

  7. Dear Beth,
    The books used in this desk were otherwise going to be destroyed. Now they got saved and reused.

  8. Jennifer said

    Why would the books be otherwise destroyed? I think that is what Beth is saying. Just curious why they could not be ‘used’ by donating? Maybe they are missing too many pages? Or illegible in some way or another? Curious… ๐Ÿ™‚

  9. Janet Moore said

    Or the books were so esoteric as to be completely worthless to all but a small population.

  10. I work in a library and we get literally tons of donated books each year that are no longer useful. They are outdated (computer manuals for Windows 90, sets of 1960 encyclopedias) of interest to such a narrow audience (agricultural reports for Wisconsin 1962-1967), just not anything anyone wants (Readers Digest condensed books) or maybe moldy or stained or missing pages. The rest we add to the collection or sell at our book sale in order to buy “better” books.

  11. Thank you Susan, that’s what i meant.

  12. Better here than a landfill!

    (P.S. Some books do have a freshness date. For example, a science book written just after the first moon shot.)