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A Free STEM Toolkit for Librarians

A Free STEM Toolkit for Librarians

https://www.freetech4teachers.com/2022/09/a-free-stem-toolkit-for-librarians.html

Idaho Commission for Libraries PDF is titled A Toolkit for Libraries Providing STEM Outreach Activities.A Toolkit for Libraries Providing STEM Outreach Activities contains directions for ten hands-on STEM activities that can be done with elementary school students. The list of activities that you will find in the toolkit include rubber band helicopters, DIY pattern blocks, and Puzzling Packets (an activity for explaining how the Internet functions).

A Toolkit for Libraries Providing STEM Outreach Activities includes directions for each of the ten activities, vocabulary lists for each activity, links to additional supporting resources, and suggested strategies for extending each lesson. And for those who would like some ideas on how to get students and parents excited about these activities, there is a page of suggested marketing strategies at the end of toolkit.”

Posted on: September 28, 2022, 6:48 am Category: Uncategorized

Perfection Fatigue Is Good News for Your Library! What Millennial & Gen Z Patrons Really Want 

Posted on: September 28, 2022, 6:21 am Category: Uncategorized

Are You A Copyright Librarian or Go-To Copyright Person?

Are You A Copyright Librarian or Go-To Copyright Person?

“The Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship, Volume 6, Issue 1, 2022 is a special issue on paths to copyright librarianship. It includes articles from go-to copyright persons including:

  • From Law Firm to Library: Finding a Second Career as a Copyright Specialist (Kate Dickson)
  • Anatomy of a New Copyright Librarian (Susan K. Kendall)
  • The Order of Success: A Slow Path to Copyright Librarianship (LeEtta M. Schmidt)
  • From Notice to Expert: Building Copyright Expertise Over Time (Stephanie Savage)
  • Being a Copyright Professional in Museum and Library Land (Kiowa Hammons)
  • A Researcher’s Curiosity, a Risk Manager’s Temperament, and an Educator’s Commitment (Maya Revzina)

You can access all of the above articles and more here.

Also, see Copyrightlaws.com’s article, Are You the Go-To Copyright Person? where we provide a five-point plan on how to become the designated copyright person in your organization.”

Via Lesley Ellen Harris

Posted on: September 28, 2022, 6:01 am Category: Uncategorized

Latest issue of IFLA Journal: Special Issue: FAIFE: Intellectual Freedom

Latest issue of IFLA Journal: Volume 48, No. 3 (October 2022)

Special Issue: FAIFE: Intellectual Freedom
Guest Editors: Barbara Jones and Stuart Hamilton

available athttps://repository.ifla.org/handle/123456789/2143

IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries.

The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.

The October 2022 issue of IFLA Journal was developed in collaboration with the IFLA Advisory Committee on Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression (FAIFE) to mark the 20th anniversary of the IFLA Statement on Libraries and Intellectual Freedom. Guest Editors solicited manuscripts which examined the impact of the statement on the library profession over the past twenty years. With an introductory essay from Alex Byrne, the issue feature seven essays, case studies, and articles that add to our understanding of the impact of the IFLA statement while seeking to understand the nature of information freedom in a period challenged by new technologies and social phenomena that are transforming the ways in which people create, use, and disseminate information.

Contents:

Essay

A declaration for all seasons: The IFLA Statement on Libraries and Intellectual Freedom
Alex Byrne

Original Articles

Intellectual freedom and alternative priorities in library and information science research: A longitudinal study
Gabriel J. Gardner

Navigating complex authorities: Intellectual freedom, information literacy and truth in pandemic STEM information
Kate Mercer, Kari D. Weaver and Khrystine Waked

Transcribing public libraries as revitalized ethical spaces
Alison Frayne

Essay

Automating intellectual freedom: Artificial intelligence, bias, and the information landscape
Catherine Smith

Case Study

Analysis of professional secrecy in Ibero-America: Ethical and legal perspectives
Alonso Estrada-Cuzcano and Karen Lizeth Alfaro-Mendives

Essays

Intellectual freedom: Waving and wavering across three national contexts
Shannon M Oltmann, Toni Samek and Louise Cooke

Long tail metaphysics: The epistemic crisis and intellectual freedom
Sarah Hartman-Caverly

Abstracts

(in IFLA’s seven official languages)

IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries. The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally. IFLA Journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

To submit an article please visit IFLA Journal on the SAGE platform.

Posted on: September 27, 2022, 10:00 am Category: Uncategorized

Pew: Social Media and News Fact Sheet

Social Media and News Fact Sheet

Social Media and News Fact Sheet

Digital news has become an important part of Americans’ news media diets, with social media playing a crucial role in news consumption. Today, half of U.S. adults get news at least sometimes from social media.

News consumption on social media

 

 

News consumption on social media

When it comes to where Americans regularly get news on social media, Facebook outpaces all other social media sites. Roughly a third of U.S. adults (31%) say they regularly get news from Facebook.

News consumption and use by social media site

A quarter of U.S. adults regularly get news from YouTube, while smaller shares get news from Twitter (14%), Instagram (13%), TikTok (10%) or Reddit (8%). Fewer Americans regularly get news from LinkedIn (4%), Snapchat (4%), Nextdoor (4%), WhatsApp (3%) or Twitch (1%).

When looking at the proportion of each social media site’s users who regularly get news there, some sites stand out as having a greater portion of users turning to the site for news even if their total audience is relatively small. For example, while Twitter is used by about three-in-ten U.S. adults (27%), about half of its users (53%) turn to the site to regularly get news there. On the other hand, roughly the same share of adults (31%) use LinkedIn, but only 13% of its users regularly get news on the site.

Social media sites by portion of users who regularly get news there

Who consumes news on each social media site

In many cases, there are demographic differences between the people who turn to each social media site regularly for news. On several of the social media sites we asked about, adults under 30 make up the largest share of those who regularly get news on the site. For example, half or more of regular news consumers on Snapchat (67%), TikTok (52%) and Reddit (50%) are ages 18 to 29. Additionally, women make up a greater portion of regular news consumers on Facebook, while the opposite is true for sites like Twitter and Reddit.

Some partisan differences also arise when it comes to who regularly gets news on some social media sites. The majority of regular news consumers on many sites are Democrats or lean Democratic. No social media site included here has regular news consumers who are more likely to be Republicans or lean Republican. (See Appendix for data on U.S. adults in each demographic group who regularly get news from each social media site.)

Demographic profiles and party identification of regular social media news consumers in the U.S.

Find out more

This fact sheet was compiled by Research Assistant Jacob Liedke and Associate Director Katerina Eva Matsa.

Read the methodology and the topline.

Pew Research Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder. This is the latest report in Pew Research Center’s ongoing investigation of the state of news, information and journalism in the digital age, a research program funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts, with generous support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Follow these links for more in-depth analysis of news consumption:

News Platform Fact Sheet, Sept. 20, 2022.

Nearly a quarter of Americans get news from podcasts, Feb. 15, 2022

Attention to COVID-19 news increased slightly amid omicron surge; partisans differ in views about the outbreak, Jan. 27, 2022

News on Twitter: Consumed by Most Users and Trusted by Many, Nov. 15, 2021

Americans who relied most on Trump for COVID-19 news among least likely to be vaccinated, Sept. 23, 2021

About four-in-ten Americans say social media is an important way of following COVID-19 vaccine news, Aug. 24, 2021

How Americans Navigated the News in 2020: A Tumultuous Year in Review, Feb. 22, 2021

More than eight-in-ten Americans get news from digital devices, Jan. 12, 2021

Measuring News Consumption in a Digital Era, Dec. 8, 2020

Many Americans Get News on YouTube, Where News Organizations and Independent Producers Thrive Side by Side, Sept. 28, 2020

Americans Who Mainly Get Their News on Social Media Are Less Engaged, Less Knowledgeable, July 30, 2020

Read all reports and short reads related to news platforms and sources.

Posted on: September 27, 2022, 6:56 am Category: Uncategorized

Princh: Social Media In Libraries And Archives

Social Media In Libraries And Archives

Social Media In Libraries And Archives

 

 

Posted on: September 27, 2022, 6:22 am Category: Uncategorized

Passport to Success: How One Intrepid Library Marketer Hatched a Plan To Bring People Back to the Library

Passport to Success: How One Intrepid Library Marketer Hatched a Plan To Bring People Back to the Library

Posted on: September 27, 2022, 6:10 am Category: Uncategorized