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Reinventing Research? Information Practices in the Humanities

Another useful report spotted by Gary Price and InfoDocket:

New Report: “Reinventing Research? Information Practices in the Humanities”

Posted on April 5, 2011 by Gary D. Price

Direct to Full Text Report (84 Pages; PDF)

A new report (case study) from the UK’s Research Information Network:

This new report is the second in a series of case studies to provide a detailed analysis of how researchers discover, use, create and manage their information resources.

This project focuses on the behaviours and needs of researchers working in a number of subject or disciplinary areas in the humanities.

The aim of RIN case studies was to: develop an in-depth understanding of humanities researchers’ approaches to information resources, provide comparisons of researchers in different subjects/disciplines, and identify barriers to more effective performance.

From a Report Summary:

The RIN has completed a second series of case studies to provide a detailed analysis of how humanities’ researchers discover, use, create and manage their information resources.

This project focuses on the behaviours and needs of researchers working in a number of subject or disciplinary areas in the humanities. They follow the first round of case studies in the life sciences(November 2009).

The overall aim of RIN case studies was to:
• develop an in-depth understanding of humanities researchers’ approaches to discovering, accessing, analysing, managing, creating, refining and disseminating information resources;
• provide comparisons between the behaviours and needs of researchers in different subjects/disciplines, research teams or institutional contexts;
• identify barriers to more effective performance in using, creating, managing and exchanging information resources, and suggest how they might be overcome.

A consortium, comprising Oxford Internet Institute, The Oxford e-Research Centre, The Centre for Digital Humanities (Univeristy College London), The Department of Information Studies (University College London) and The Virtual Knowledge Studio for the Humanities and Social Sciences (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and Maastricht University), was appointed as contractor for the study.

Direct to Full Text Report (84 Pages; PDF)

See Also: Also From RIN and RLUK: “The Value of Libraries for Research and Researchers”

UPDATE: Roy Tennant posts a link to the top “findings as summarized by the Europeana Libraries blog:

Make it easy to use.
Make it easy to cite.
Put it in their workflow.
Provide clarity on objects and processes.
Build a community.
Provide ressearch support.
Make the information easily reusable.
Offer ways to visualize collections.
Think about linked data.
Provide a critical mass of content.”

Stephen

Posted on: April 27, 2011, 6:44 am Category: Uncategorized

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