Skip to content


A Guide for Marketers About Intellectual Property (IP)

A Guide for Marketers About Intellectual Property (IP)

A Guide for Marketers About Intellectual Property (IP)

 

Posted on: October 21, 2020, 6:57 am Category: Uncategorized

Off the Shelf: The Cost of Low Literacy Levels

Off the Shelf: The Cost of Low Literacy Levels

Posted on: October 20, 2020, 2:39 pm Category: Uncategorized

“School Enrollment in the United States: 2018”

“School Enrollment in the United States: 2018”

https://www.infodocket.com/2020/10/07/new-report-data-school-enrollment-in-the-united-states-2018/

“School Enrollment in the United States: 2018” was published today by the U.S. Census.

From the U.S. Census:

School Enrollment in the United States: 2018” that examines the characteristics of people enrolled in school at all levels using statistics from the Current Population Survey and the American Community Survey.  This report does not reflect any possible impacts related to COVID-19, but instead serves as a pre-crisis benchmark for future research. The report outlines the current picture of education in America from nursery school through eighth grade, high school, and college undergraduate and graduate students, and compares the latest numbers with historical levels.

Since 2000, preschool enrollment has grown more slowly than in the period from 1979 to 2000 and the percentage of college students age 30 and over has contracted. High school dropout rates have fallen and college students ages 20 and 21 continue to attend college in high numbers.

Data highlights:

  • The population of nursery school students grew by over 2 million from 1979 to 2000, but only around half a million from 2000 to 2018. In 2018, enrollment in nursery school was 4.8 million, which is 60% of the population of three- and four-year-olds.
  • In 2000, 18% of undergraduate college students were age 30 or older, compared to 14% in 2018.
  • High school dropout rates among those ages 18 to 24 declined from 13% in 2005 to 6% in 2018.
  • In 1960, 19% of the population ages 20 and 21; 9% of the population ages 22 to 24; and 5% of the population ages 25 to 29 were in school. By 2018, these numbers significantly increased to 55%, 28% and 13%, respectively. From 2011 to 2018, enrollment rates dropped among the older age groups but did not change statistically among those ages 20 and 21.

Detailed tabulations, related information and historic data are available on the Census Bureau’s School Enrollment page.

Direct to Full Text Report
15 pages; PDF.

Direct to Infographic: Characteristics of College Students

Posted on: October 20, 2020, 7:00 am Category: Uncategorized

Going Live on Facebook? Here are Three Tips to Maximize the Reach of Your Library’s Virtual Programs

Going Live on Facebook? Here are Three Tips to Maximize the Reach of Your Library’s Virtual Programs

Going Live on Facebook? Here are Three Tips to Maximize the Reach of Your Library’s Virtual Programs

 

Posted on: October 20, 2020, 7:00 am Category: Uncategorized

Microsoft and partners aim to shrink the ‘data desert’ limiting accessible AI

Microsoft and partners aim to shrink the ‘data desert’ limiting accessible AI

“AI-based tools like computer vision and voice interfaces have the potential to be life-changing for people with disabilities, but the truth is those AI models are usually built with very little data sourced from those people. Microsoft is working with several nonprofit partners to help make these tools reflect the needs and everyday realities of people living with conditions like blindness and limited mobility.”

Posted on: October 20, 2020, 6:55 am Category: Uncategorized

How to Boost Engagement with Your Little Free Library

How to Boost Engagement with Your Little Free Library

Little Free Libraries are becoming increasingly common. There are more than 100,000 official libraries worldwide and likely thousands more that people have built on their own. During the COVID-19 crisis, many have been transformed into Little Free Pantries, offering food for community members in need. 

The team at Wikibuy created a fun Little Free Library Log printable resource for boosting engagement with your library. Here’s how it works: you cut out these logs and tape them to the inside of your books. 

Then, whoever picks up a book from your library can fill out the date they picked it up, their name, how they felt about the book and their contact information if they’d like to chat about their thoughts on the book with future owners. 

In other words, as the book changes owners and moves from library to library, there’s a log of who had it before and how they felt about the book. 

Even if you don’t have a library of your own, you could tape these logs into books that you borrow from or donate to Little Free Libraries in your community. 

For those who don’t have a Little Free Library but want to build a homemade version, check out this printable Little Free Library sign. It’s as simple as gathering together some books in a box or a sturdy wooden container and taping this “help your-shelf” sign to it. 

Check out more ideas of what to do with old books and download the Little Free Library printable book resources

 

 

Posted on: October 20, 2020, 6:00 am Category: Uncategorized

De-escalation is the new customer service: Training to deal with angry, maskless patrons

De-escalation is the new customer service: Training to deal with angry, maskless patrons

“I used to think that a bad tipper was the worst kind of customer. Little did I know”

https://www.salon.com/2020/10/05/de-escalation-training-customer-service-angry-mask-restaurant-store/

 

Posted on: October 19, 2020, 7:00 am Category: Uncategorized